Sunday, August 31, 2014

The Rock 'n' Roll Tourist 2014: Mission (of Burma) Accomplished



No, this is not a real review of The Mission of Burma show in Portland last night. I made the mistake of bookings flight back to New Mexico at the ungodly hour of 7:35 am the morning after a Mission of Burma show.

But suffice it for now to say that they were tremendous. I'll have more details in Friday's Terrell's Tune-up column. And HERE is my review of their most recent album.

Now back to my daze.

Saturday, August 30, 2014

The Rock 'n' Roll Tourist 2014: An Evening with Negativland

PORTLAND, OREGON _ And now for something completely different ...
No, there wasn't a guitar in sight. But this was rock 'n' roll.

Negativland, a sonic-collage, multi-media, socio-political art collective from San Francisco that's well into their fourth decade as an entertainment unit, headlined a show at Portland's Crystal Ballroom Friday night. 

Negativland is an unlikely crew of revolutionaries, all four members wearing gray plaid shirts that might have come off the rack at K-Mart. But don't be fooled. They are subversive. 

Employing sound and video from TV news, radio talk shows, government training movies, commercials, old educational films, all chopped up, manipulated and distorted on top of electronic noises and sound effects, this show the group has named "Content" was thought-provoking, hilarious, incomprehensible, annoying and almost mystical  -- sometimes all at once. 

They take all these messages -- political, commercial, religious education -- that we're bombarded with constantly, throw it into an electronic blender and create new, frequently hilarious art. 


More than once an old Frank Zappa lyric popped into my overwhelmed mind: "American way, try to explain / Scab of a nation, driven insane."

Here are a few notes I pecked out on my iPhone during the show. If any of this makes some se to you, please report to the Department of Homeland Security:
"Leave the premises"

"Never forget the fact that we are all just content..."

(Footage of mashing potatoes with M.A.S.H. logo occasionally flashing. Chopping vegetables with an LP)

A bearded guy, could pass for a scientist in a 1950s B movie, talking about Congress considering a plan that involves melting the North Pole.

Report on a county fair. Guy starts talking about oil wells.

Gun toting granny on wheel chair.

An angry  woman, looks kind of like a Fox News blonde, angrily ranting that she spends all day on Facebook but NOBODY SHARES MY POSTS! At one point she yells, "Get the fuck off the Internet!"

"Guns and the bible carved this nation out of the wilderness."

"It's easy to imagine the end of the world but you cannot imagine the end of capitalism."

The word "Cadillac" is put on a loop, sped up. Becomes a bizarre chant.

A distorted ad for the Playboy Channel. Train going in and out of tunnel A Guy talks about some kind of. interference wrecking his orgasm on the Playboy Channel.


"This statement is false. This statement is true ...."

And now the voices of Negativland are stuck in my head. 

Friday, August 29, 2014

The Rock 'n' Roll Tourist 2014: Gettin' Some Culture


PORTLAND, OREGON _ I think Rick Miller was wearing the same  "Hillbilly Surf Club" T-shirt when I saw Southern Culture on the Skids 14 years ago at Santa Fe's Paramount club. Oh well. He wears it well.

Or maybe I was just having a flashback, one induced not by illegal and dangerous drugs, but by the fact that I think Southern Culture on the Skids were playing most of the same songs they played in Santa Fe all those years ago.

"Banana Puddin'," "Too Much Pork For Just One Fork,"  "House of Bamboo," "Liquored Up, Lacquered Down," "Nitty Gritty" ... All the hits, (speaking relatively, of course. Very few of the music acts around today that I like have actually had anything approaching a "hit.")

Not that I'm complaining, mind you. I would have been bitterly disappointed if Mary Huff hadn't done "Daddy Was a Preacher, Mama was a Go-Go Girl" (my favorite SCOTS song of all time) or if Miller hadn't called out "Little Debbie, Little Debbie!" during "Camel Walk."

And yes, I thoroughly enjoyed the fried chicken-tossing during the song "Eight Piece Box," which is a frequent ritual during a SCOTS show. Several enthusiastic audience members joined the band on stage for the fun during this. My biggest accomplishment of the evening was hitting Miller in the face with a piece of wing that had landed near my feet.

The band did perform a couple of tunes from their 2010 Kudzu Ranch album ("Bone Dry Dirt" and "Pig Pickin' "). But I wouldn't have minded if they'd done some of their more recent material like "Zombified" (maybe they save that one for Halloween) or their heartfelt cover of The Kinks' "Muswell Hillbilly" or some obscure older tunes like "The Man Who Wrestles the Bear" or "Carve That Possum."

I know I'm sounding like a finnicky, know-it-all critic here, and that misses the point of a Southern Culture on the Skids show.
This North Carolina trio, which includes drummer Dave Hartman, celebrates all the gloriously trashy things that make America great -- not just the South -- great. Greasy food; hotrods; sex; loud, twangy guitars; tacky tiki bars; voodoo ...

Their name might invoke an image of a culture in decline -- and maybe it was suppose to back in the '80s when they started. But SCOTS' upbeat, swampy mix of hillbilly, surf, rockabilly, exotica and soul actually is an expression of a culture I'm proud to be part of.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

The Rock 'n' Roll Tourist 2014: Afghan Whigs Are the Fire

PORTLAND, OREGON _ The Afghan Whigs left us on an artistic high note back at the end of the last century. Their album 1965 was full of the crazy, burning, obsessive passion that characterized their greatest work throughout the '90s.

The group didn't sound much like Roy Orbison  -- they were more like an insane cross of Dinosaur Jr. and Isaac Hayes' band at Wattstax -- but singer Gregg Dulli's songs share some emotional traits with those of Orbison. Like the older singer, you can imagine Dulli becoming spiritually obsessed with a pretty woman walking down the street, and having his spirit cruelly demolished when the stranger keeps walking even after his best "Rrrrrrrrwwwwwllllll!" Of course, Dulli would take it further. It's easy to imagine him following the poor girl home and howling at her window until the dawn.

So The Afghan Whigs broke up. Dull carried on without the rest of the band. But despite some occasional intriguing flashes from The Twilight Singers or The Gutter Twins of his solo work, nothing reached the dizzying heights of the Whigs.


I was skeptical earlier this year when I found out that a new version of The Afghan Whigs had risen from the rock 'n' roll tarpits. I was so apprehensive of possible -- I thought probable -- disappointment, that I put off checking out their new album, Do the Beast for nearly four months. (Only two original members, Dulli and bassist John Curley are part of the album.)
But all my fears were for naught. The album is one of the best of the year so far. And their show at The Doug Fir, a cellar full of noise, as Petula Clark would say, in east Portland, showed them full of the power and rage that made us love them in the first place.

And yes, the new songs stand proudly with the old. They opened with a couple of the most intense songs from Do the Beast, "Parked Outside," which began with a weird violin solo by multi-instrumentalist Rick Nelson (yes, that's his name) before launching into its frightening robo-blues beat. This seamlessly was followed by another Beast song, " Matamoros," which is more ferocious live than on the record. Another standout Wednesday from the the new album was "The Lottery," which starts out with drums straight out of the Shaft soundtrack.
They didn't forget their '90s work. The Whigs cranked out amazing renditions of "John the Baptist,"  (my. Favorite song on 1965), an explosive "My Enemy" from Black Love, and the title song of Gentlemen.

They also did a handful of covers, including a slow, twisted Whigs-eye take on The Police's "Every Little Thing She Does is Magic" (Dulli hops off the stage and walks among the crowd during this) and, in the encore, the first verse of the overture from Jesus Christ Superstar.  (Longtime fans will recall that The Whigs covered "The Temple" from JCSS way back on their album Congregation. On Wednesday this served as the introduction to "Something Hot," another 1965 tune.

The best number of the evening though was the wild medley of a couple of Do the Beast  songs, Royal Cream,"  which starts out, "I know you've been sleepin' with another demon..." and the spooky "I am Fire," on which Dulli emphasizes his lyrics by pounding on a floor tom. And somehow this mutates into a dark take on Fleetwood Mac's "Tusk."

"Don't say that you love me! Just tell me that you need me!"

Damn! After 16 years or however long it's been I almost forgot how much I needed The Afghan Whigs.

This post has been edited for an embarrassing number of typos.

Sunday, August 24, 2014

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

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Sunday, August 24, 2014 
KSFR, Santa Fe, N.M. 
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell
Webcasting!
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's the playlist below

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Friday, August 22, 2014

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST


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Friday, August 22, 2014 
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM 
Webcasting! 
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell 
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist below:






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Mustache on the Cabbage: A Music History Lesson

The album where I first heard "Cabbage Head" in the '80s

Here's the tale about a funny little song that has bounced across the ocean, across the centuries and across musical genres.

Back in the early 80s, when I first started getting into the iconic New Orleans piano man, Professor Longhair, I came across a song that sounded familiar. The name of the tune was "Cabbage Head." It was a funny story of a man who comes home "as tired as I can be" several nights in a row. And each night he sees something suspicious and out of place. Each time, his wife Sally has an explanation, but it doesn't quite add up.

Hear for yourself on the video below. (UPDATE 2017: Unfortunately Fess' version has disappeared from YouTube. Closest thing I can find now is the Dr. John cover)


The thing is, I'd heard the song years before, albeit, with a different melody and slightly different lyrics. The British folk-rock band Steeleye Span had recorded it on one of their early albums, Ten Man Mop under the name "Four Nights Drunk."



Notice here that the cuckolded narrator is "so drunk I couldn't see" rather than "tired as a man can be."

Sung by Martin Carthy, backed by fiddler Peter Knight, "Four Nights Drunk" listed "Traditional" under the songwriter credits.

And traditional it is. According to several sources it was known in London in the 1760s under the name "The Merry Cuckold and the Kind Wife." It's one the 300-plus Child Ballads (traditional ballads from the British Isles collected by Francis James Child during the 1800s) under the rather boring title "Our Goodman." And reportedly, it was popular in other European countries

The versions collected by Child have lyrics are slightly different than Fess 'or Steeleye's or any of the modern verses I've come across. But despite the archaic dalect, you get the same basic idea. Here's the first verse of the first version:

 Hame came our goodman,
And hame came he,
And then he saw a saddle-horse,
Where nae horse should be.
‘What’s this now, goodwife?
What’s this I see?
How came this horse here,
Without the leave o me?’
‘A horse?’ quo she.
‘Ay, a horse,’ quo he.
‘Shame fa your cuckold face,
Ill mat ye see!
’Tis naething but a broad sow,
My minnie sent to me.’
‘A broad sow?’ quo he.
‘Ay, a sow,’ quo shee.
‘Far hae I ridden,
And farrer hae I gane,
 But a sadle on a sow’s back
 I never saw nane.’

And some of the lyrics were actually raunchy, as the drunken or "tired" narrator discovers other strange things in his bed. ("Who owns that thing in your thing where my old thing should be?") Most of those verses didn't make it to recordings, however -- though years ago I remember hearing a version by English folksinger Ewan MacColl that was downright nasty. Unfortunately, I can't find that online.

So how did this song get from the misty moisty British Isle to Roy Byrd's piano in New Orleans?

Apparently, like so many old British, Scottish and Irish folk songs, it  came over with immigrants from those parts and found a home in the American South. Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music has a version titled "Drunkard's Special" by a singer named Coley Jones. J.E. Mainer did a dandy version called "Three Nights Drunk," that was recorded by Alan Lomax and included in the Southern Journey series. Riley Puckett, backed by Gid Tanner on fiddle did a similar version.



There's a more modern version from 1958 called "Mustache on the Cabbage Head" by Luke Gordon that skirts the borders of country and rockabilly:



Blues and R&B artists discovered the song also. Blind Lemon Jefferson did a version called  "Laboring Man Away from Home" (which, sadly I've never heard and can't find online). Ruth Brown did a slow, jazzy "Cabbage Head." And Sonny Boy Williamson did a great version called "Wake Up Baby" in 1958, that has the same basic melody as Professor Longhair's. He also was "as tired as a man can be."



Meanwhile, back across the Atlantic, the Irish folk band known as The Dubliners had a hit with their version called "Seven Drunken Nights." (Decades later the Chicago Celt-Punk band called The Tossers did a similar, if more rocked-out, version with the same title.)




And why am I not surprised that the song found its way to the late great Rudy Ray Moore, who recorded it not once, but twice. He called it "Old Cabbage Head" on his 1994 Return of Dolemite - "Superstar" album and, a truly filthy version on 21st Century Dolemite. The earlier one is a country spoof featuring "the world's first black country & western female singer, Jeannie Marie." The latter is harder-edged and funkier.

The song has appeared under titles such as  "Three Nights in a Barroom," "The Blind Fool,"  "Five Nights' Experience," "Coming Home Late," "Shickered As He Could Be" and others.

And somehow, just about all these versions make me grin when I hear these poor drunk, or "tired" people tell of the saddles on the sows and the mustaches on the cabbages they find in their homes.

Here's a Spotify playlist of many of the versions mentioned here and a few that weren't. (Unfortunately, they don't have Professor Longhair.)

Monday, August 18, 2014

New Big Enchilada Podcast: Another Fine Showcase of American Hillbilly Music


THE BIG ENCHILADA




Welcome to the latest Big Enchilada podcast, Varmint Symphony. It's a hillbilly spectacular featuring raw animal country, rockabilly, bluesgrass, blues, country swing, cowpunk and other sounds to tickle your innards .Have fun, but don't let the possums get in your underwear drawer.

 SUBSCRIBE TO ALL GARAGEPUNK PIRATE RADIO PODCASTS |

Here's the playlist
(Background Music: Greasy String by The West Virginia Coon Hunters)
Animal Hoedown by Harry Hayward
Johnny Law by Wayne Hancock
Someone Like You by Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys
Can't Pretend by Holly Golightly & The Brokeoffs
When That Helicopter Comes by The Handsome Family
Carve Dat Possum by Harry C. Brown & The Peerless Quartet

(Background Music: White Heat by Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys)
Devil Ain't No Quitter by James Hand
Sucker for a Cheap Guitar by Ronnie Dawson
The Pequot Dance Floor by Angry Johnny & The Killbillies
Him No Mo' by Crumb Catcher
Big T by Dale Watson
Where Do Ya Want It by Whitey Morgan & The 78s
Long in the Tooth by Billy Joe Shaver

(Background Music: Fiesta Alegre by Flaco Jimenez y Max Baca)
The Weasel, Bean, Frog and Dog by Splitlip Rayfield
21 Days in Jail by Magic Sam
Truckin' Little Woman by Dave & Phil Alvin
Big Bad Wolf by Clinton O'Neal & The Country Drifters
Set Up Another Drink by Carl Phillips
Coffee Grinder Blues by Asylum Street Spankers

Play it here:



Sunday, August 17, 2014

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST


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Sunday, August 17, 2014 
KSFR, Santa Fe, N.M. 
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell
Webcasting!
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's the playlist below;
OPENING THEME: Let it Out, Let it All Hang Out by The Hombres
God is a Bullet by Concrete Blonde
Go-Go Girls by Sam the Sham & The Pharoahs
Just a Little Bit of You by The A-Bones
On My Way to Houston by Powell St. John & The Aliens
Living in Squalor by Chump
Stukas Over Disneyland by The Dickies
Devil Drag Strip by The Fumes
Staring Down by New Mystery Girl
Skinny Mama by Floyd Jones

Stuff They Call Money by Dave & Phil Alvin
Buzz Buzz Buzz by The Blasters
21 Days in Jail by Magic Sam
Black Cadillac by Figures of Light
Sharknado by The Barbaraellatones 
Linda's Gone by The Black Angels
Epopeya by Doctor Simio
Cockroach Crawl by the Del-Gators

Everybody Got a Little Devil in Their Soul by Bobby Patterson
Big Bad John by Big John Hamilton 
Escape by Night by King Shark
Stop Breakin' Down Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears
One More Try by Barrence Whitfield & The Savages
Ain't No Sunshine by Freddie King
Maybe Your Baby by The Dirtbombs
Your Love Belongs Under a Rock by Bobby Patterson

All Tomorrow's Parties by Frontier Circus
Black Girls by Violent Femmes
I Dig Black Girls by Charlie Whitehead
Saved by The Mighty Clouds of Joy
That's Life by Big Maybelle
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Friday, August 15, 2014

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST


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Friday, August 15, 2014 
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM 
Webcasting! 
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell 
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist below:
OPENING THEME: Buckaroo by Buck Owens 
Sick Rick by Misery Jackals
Monroe by Howlin' Brothers
Highway Cafe by Kinky Friedman
Lug Nut Larry by Dale Watson
The King's Shilling by Del McCoury
Jezebelle by Steve Train & His Bad Habits
Side by Side Doublewides by The Hickoids
The Spasm by Daddy Stovepipe & Mississippi Sarah

Just Let Go/ It Ain't All Flowers by Sturgill Simpson
Yankee Taste by Jayke Orvis
Highway 41 by Husky Burnette
Gotta Get to Heaven by Scott H. Biram
Baby Let Me Follow You Down by Bob Dylan & The Band
Can You Blame the Colored Man by South Memphis String Band
The Cockfight by Sam the Sham & The Pharoahs
I Wear the Scars by James Hand


Dave & Phil Alvin set
How You Want it Done by Dave & Phil
Never No More Blues by The Blasters
Collins Cave by Phil Alvin
So Long Baby by Jo-el Sonnier
Goodbye Again by Dave Alvin with Rosie Flores
Just a Dream by Dave & Phil
House aren't Stomp/Crawdad Hole by Big Bill Broonzy
Long White Cadillac by Janis Martin
Big Bill Blues by Dave & Phil

A Girl Named Johnny Cash by Harry Hayward
Checkers and Chess by Billy Joe Shaver
Down to Seeds and Stems Again by Commander Cody & The Lost Planet Airmen
One Last Look by Angry Johnny & The Killbillies
Epitaph (Black and Blue) by Kris Kristofferson 

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Thursday, August 14, 2014

TERRELL'S TUNE-UP: More Soul ... And a Little Reggae Too

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
August 14, 2014

Singer Bobby Patterson just released a new album, I Got More Soul!, the latest in a career that goes back decades. It’s a fun and, yes, soulful album by a veteran performer with deep roots in 1960s soul.

Don’t feel bad if you’ve never heard of this guy. I hadn’t heard of him either until I stumbled into his 70th birthday celebration a few months ago. It was during South by Southwest in Austin, and Patterson, a Dallas native, was opening for Barrence Whitfield & The Savages at a joint called C-Boy’s Heart & Soul.

And yes, I was impressed. I just hope I have as much fun on my 70th birthday as Patterson appeared to be having on his. I’ve looked forward to this album since that night.

So what’s Patterson’s story? Don’t ask me. Ask him. In the song “Poet,” Patterson sings, “I wrote songs for Fontella Bass/Oh, she talked a lot of sass/I wrote songs for Albert King/made his guitar sing, yeah/Wrote a song for Chuck Jackson/Knew I’d step up the action/I’m a songwriter, I’m a poet.” 

“Poet” is one of two cover songs on the album. Obviously Patterson felt qualified to add a verse of his own to a tune written and recorded by Sly Stone, but what he adds to the song is true for the most part. 

Though Patterson started out as a performer, most of his success in the music biz was behind the scenes. He did write or co-write songs for Bass, Jackson, and King (although King probably deserves the credit for making his guitar sing on the song “That’s What the Blues Is All About”), not to mention for Little Johnny Taylor.

Patterson’s career as a recording artist goes back to the 1960s, though he never had a national hit himself. Critics weren’t always kind to him, either. “If there is such a thing as an average 1960s soul singer, Bobby Patterson is it,” the All Music Guide wrote in a review of Taking Care of Business, a Patterson compilation of his ’60s works released in the mid-1990s.
Bobby turns 70 in Austin

So for more than 20 years beginning in 1972, Patterson concentrated on being a producer, promoter, and songwriter. Then in the mid-1990s, Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, with his side project group Golden Smog, recorded a country-rock version of an old Patterson song called “She Don’t Have to See You (To See Through You).” 

Though Golden Smog never rose above cult status, this recording apparently stirred something in Patterson, whose name was misspelled in the CD credits. He began to record again, releasing an album with the hopeful title of Second Coming in 1996, followed by I’d Rather Eat Soup two years later. But except for reissues and retrospectives, that was the last new material from Patterson until now. So I guess that makes I Got More Soul! Patterson’s second “second coming.”

The album came about thanks to a guitar player named Zach Ernst, who used to play with Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears. In recent years, he has been playing with The Relatives, a Texas gospel group that was founded in the early 1970s. The Relatives sing background on Patterson’s “Everybody’s Got a Little Devil in Their Soul,” originally recorded in the early ’70s by a lady named Tommie Young. It’s one of the highlights of I Got More Soul!

Most the songs here are upbeat and funky. Some of them, like the bouncy Solomon Burke-influenced “I Feel the Same Way,” evoke the classic soul era of the ’60s. Then there’s the harder-edged “Can You Feel Me,” which would sound at home on a latter-period Isley Brothers record. Patterson also has a knack for slow-dance soul ballads like “I Know How It Feels” and “Let Me Heal It.”

I suspect it’s Ernst who introduced Patterson to “Your Love Belongs Under a Rock,” a song by Detroit’s garage/soul/rock giants The Dirtbombs. Patterson makes it sound like a long-lost Stax/Volt hit.

The album ends with a sweet, slow tune called “The Entertainer Part 1” (there’s no part two, at least not here), on which Patterson raps and brags: “If you’re walkin’ on the dirt and the dirt ain’t walkin’ on you, well I’ll entertain you … I don’t care if you’re in the hood or in the trunk/Ain’t no way you can get away from my funk … I got something for everyone who woke up on the right side of the wrong bed with a mad head and no bread. Ha ha! It’s called soul.”

Call it what you want. Bobby Patterson is the mad soul scientist we never knew we had.

Also recommended:

 * Crucial Time by King Shark. Alphanso Henclewood has been living in landlocked Northern New Mexico for nearly 15 years, but he was born in the Greenwich Farm neighborhood of Kingston, Jamaica, an area dominated by the fishing industry. 

But Greenwich Farm has also produced a lot of reggae musicians — most notably Earl “Chinna” Smith. And it’s where Henclewood was crowned “King Shark” and where he returns from time to time to record music. While Shark over the years has released his own songs on compilation albums from his Pecos-based Montego Records label (two volumes of King Shark and All Star Friends), Crucial Time is his first solo album, though he’s backed by some of his all-star friends, including guitarist Smith.

These songs recall the reggae I loved back in the heady days of the ’70s. One of the outstanding tunes is the harrowing “Escape by Night,” a history lesson in a minor key that deals with escaping from a slave ship. “Palm Me Corner” is set in modern times. It’s about being hassled by police just for hanging out on a street corner. (“I’m not a bad boy,” the singer protests, “I don’t fire no guns!”) 

But the vibe of this album isn’t all political. Shark also sings songs of love such as “Marry Me,” “She Will Be Mine,” and two versions of a tune called “Pure Light.” He sings, “Oh yes, you beautiful woman, I want you to understand, tonight is the night you will be mine.”

Besides releasing his own album, Shark also produced Burning Fire, a new album by longtime Jamaican singer Prince Alla (born Keith Blake), and released it on Montego Records. 

Alla has been a reggae recording artist since the ’70s and has contributed songs to King Shark compilations. My favorite song on the album is “Mortimor,” which is about an old Rasta man who follows the instructions of a little bird, packs up his Bible and his last pound of herb, and sails away in his boat to Africa.

King Shark also recently became a DJ. He’s got a reggae show on KTAO-FM 101.9 Solar Radio from 7 to 9 p.m. on Sundays. You can listen online at www.ktao.com. 

And the king also is promoting reggae concerts in Taos. He's got Israel Vibration, a trio from Jamaica coming for an outdoor show at KTAO Solar Center on August 24. Tickets are $25 in advance.

Here are some videos

Bobby Patterson live in 2013



And here's a short interview with King Shark



And here's King Shark interviewing Prince Alla

Monday, August 11, 2014

Sneak Peak: New Gospel Album from James Hand


James "Slim" Hand that country singer from Waco, Texas who amazed and delighted New Mexico folks at a Santa Fe Bandstand show last year, has a new gospel album set for release in October.

I've been lucky enough to hear an advance version of Stormclouds in Heaven, so I can tell you, it's a pure country gem.

Like any good country gospel albums, there are plenty of upbeat foot-stompin' "Praise Jesus!" songs on this album including "Lord Above," "My Savior as My Guide," "Why Oh Why," and the wry, "Devil Ain't No Quitter," a spiritual descendant of Bob Wills' "The Devil Ain't Lazy."

But this is a James Hand album, so even though it's full of the light of God, and amazing grace, you know you're going to have those clouds of fear and doubt alluded to in the title. As he sings in the title song, "Why do I stand at twilight and watch the setting sun / so afraid to face the light I want to turn and run ..."
James Hand and me at KSFR studios last year

And in "Tomorrow When," the singer wonders, "Where on Earth can Heaven be? / Where's that shing stair? /Just as near or far from me as it was on my last prayer."

Indeed, few singers around today capture the struggle between faith and hopelessness, fear and salvation as well as James Hand. In the post-Johnny Cash era, it's hard to find country gospel  this powerful.

Two of the songs here have previously appeared on Hand's old Rounder albums: "If I Live Long Enough to Heal" (from Shadow on the Ground) and, one of my favorite Hand songs of all time, "Men Like Me Can Fly" (from Shadow on the Ground).

And here's some incentive for ordering in advance: The special-bonus-James-Hand-fanatics edition of the CD will have two bonus songs,  "Darlin' of her Her Daddy's Eye" and "Lullaby Trail." These will be available only for the first 250 people who order online at jameshand.com . (It'll be shipped prior to the official release date for those who order by Aug 31st.)

Here's the first video from Stormclouds in Heaven. "I Wear the Scars," subtitled "Bobby's Song"  was written for a Viet Nam vet friend of Hand's who died last year.


Sunday, August 10, 2014

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

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Sunday, August 10, 2014 
KSFR, Santa Fe, N.M. 
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell
Webcasting!
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's the playlist below

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast! CLICK HERE Big Contact Little player

Friday, August 08, 2014

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST


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Friday, August 8, 2014 
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM 
Webcasting! 
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell 
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist below:






Like the Santa Fe Opry Facebook page 

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast! CLICK HERE
Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

Thursday, August 07, 2014

New Team-up of Mavis & Chuck


Here's my favorite Marvel Team-Up of the year: Mavis Staples and Chuck D! "Give We the Pride is from Chuck's new album The Black in Man.

And besides the great music and message, it's got some footage of Chess Studios in Chicago, sacred ground where I made a rock 'n' roll pilgrimage a few years ago.

Enjoy the video!





Monday, August 04, 2014

Handsome Family on the Plaza: Rescheduled for Wednesday

OK, I'm cheating here and basically re-posting my item on The Handsome Family from last week with updated info.




The Handsome Family got rained out of their Santa Fe Bandstand show last week, but they've been rescheduled for Wednesday, August 6.

The Handsomes start at 7:45. Opening for them is Bill Hearne, who starts at 6:30 pm

This will be the first time Brett & Rennie Sparks, who live in Albuquerque, have played in Santa Fe since their song "Far From Any Road," because famous earlier this year as the opening theme of HBO's True Detective.

That's a great song, but The Handsome Family has tons of great songs. Here's one of them, "Woodpecker," from their most recent album, Wilderness.



And here's a live performance at the Mineshaft Tavern a few years ago:



And here's the radio interview I did with them on The Santa Fe Opry last year. (The interview starts a little over 15 minutes into it.)


Sunday, August 03, 2014

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

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Sunday, August 3, 2014 
KSFR, Santa Fe, N.M. 
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell
Webcasting!
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's the playlist below

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast! CLICK HERE

Friday, August 01, 2014

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST


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Friday, August 1, 2014 
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM 
Webcasting! 
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell 
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist below:






Like the Santa Fe Opry Facebook page 

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast! CLICK HERE
Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017 KSFR, Santa Fe, NM Webcasting! 10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM Ema...