Sunday, May 21, 2017

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, May 21, 2017
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Death March by The Black Angels
Skintrade by The Mekons
Out of the Question by The Seeds
Alligator Wine by Fifty Foot Combo & Reverend Beat-Man
You Must Be a Witch by Dead Moon
Two Ton Feather by Dion
In Heaven by The Pixies
Jesus Christ Pose by Soundgarden

The Black Dog Runs at Night by Angelo Badalamenti
The Grace by The Molting Vultures
Strychnine in My Lemonade by The Ghost Wolves
Broken Racehorse by The Blind Shake
Staying Underground by Destination Lonely
Astral Plane by The Modern Lovers
It's Suicide by Mark Sultan
Kiss My Sister's Fist by The King Khan & BBQ Show
Up in Flames by Koko Taylor

Baby Please Don't Go by Them
In Dreams by Roy Orbison
I Must Be the Devil by Glambilly
Beehive by Mark Lanegan
Apocalyptica Blues by Blind Butcher
Mother Sky by CAN
Blues Without Reason by The Vagoos
Blue Velvet by Bobby Vinton

The Spell by Afghan Whigs
Dark Night of the Soul by Danger Mouse & Sparklehorse with David Lynch
Ain't But the One Way by Julian Cope
Sycamore Trees by Jimmy Scott
Port of Amsterdam by Dave Van Ronk
Questions in a World of Blue by Julee Cruise
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Friday, May 19, 2017

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST



Friday, May 19, 2017
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Buckaroo by Buck Owens
You're Crazy for Taking the Bus by Jonathan Richman
Little But I'm Loud by Rosie Flores
She Gave Up on Herself by Miss Lesley
Hogtied Over You by Billy Bacon & The Forbidden Pigs with Candye Kane
The Other Woman by Loretta Lynn
Bus Breakdown by Dale Watson & Ray Watson
Humpty Dump Jump by L.A. Rivercatz
Griselda by Yo La Tengo
Bonaparte's Retreat by Holy Modal Rounders
Pablo Picasso Never Got Called Redneckerson by Frontier Circus

New Mexico Blues by John Wagner
Don't Leave It Lie by Shinyribs
Queen of the Minor Key by Eilen Jewell
What Makes Bob Holler by Bob Wills & The Texas Playboys
Sweet Kind of Love by Don Walser
God's Problem Child by Willie Nelson with Tony Joe White, Leon Russel & Jamie Johnson
This Land is Our Land Redux by Slim Cessna's Auto Club
The Hand of the Almighty by John R. Butler

Get Up and Go / Fiddle Tunes by David Bromberg
Hello, I'm a Truck by Red Simpson
On the Road Again by Memphis Jug Band
Waiting for a Train by Jimmie Rodgers
One Bad Shoe by The Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band
Rusty Cage by Johnny Cash
Make it Up to Mama by Sarah Shook & The Disarmers
No Glory by The Eagle Rock Gospel Singers

You Don't Hear Me Crying by Modern Mal
I'm Gonna Love You by Jimmie Dale Gilmore
Hope the High Road by Jason Isbell
She Never Spoke Spanish to Me by Joe Ely
Long Black Veil by Hazel Dickens & Alice Gerrard
Lesson in Depression by James Hand
Country Bumpkin by Cal Smith
CLOSING THEME: Comin' Down by The Meat Puppets


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Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

Thursday, May 18, 2017

THROWBACK THURSDAY: In Praise of American Epic


Will Shade with The Memphis Jug Band
OK, my advice to you is to quit reading this blog post and go sit yourself in front of your TV -- or your iPad or whatever you use for a TV these days -- and start watching the PBS series American Epic

It's a 3-part series about American roots music in the early 20th Century, co-produced by Jack White and T-Bone Burnett and narrated by Robert Redford. There is lots of rare footage and photos, a soundtrack full of spooky old country, blues and folk classics and interviews with living musicians -- Charlie Musselwhite, Taj Mahal, Willie Nelson etc. -- talking about how this music enriched their lives.

Episode 1 of the series is already available. "The Big Bang" focuses on two great acts from the 1920s, The Carter Family and The Memphis Jug Band, discovered by Ralph Peer, the Columbia Records A&R man who traveled the south seeking recording artists, black and white, to appeal to rural audiences.  (You can watch on your computer HERE.)

Below is a trailer for the series, followed by some songs that are featured in that first episode.





Here's Jimmie Rodgers, foreshadowing MTV by 50 years or so,



Here are Maybelle and Sara Carter reunited on The Johnny Cash Show in 1970. Johnny says it's their first time performing together in 27 years (though actually they'd recorded together in 1963 and did a bunch of shows together in the '60s.)



I love whoever decided to film this song by Whistler's Jug Band way back when.


In American Epic, the rapper Nas compares jug band music with gangsta rap. “These guys are talking about carrying guns, shooting something, protecting their honor, chasing after some woman who’s done them dirty. It didn’t start with hip-hop. It started a long time ago. It started with America.”

Here's The Memphis Jug Band singing about what Kinky Friedman calls "Peruvian Marching Powder."



And here's American Epic: The Soundtrack on Spotify. But listen to it after you watch the show!


Wednesday, May 17, 2017

WACKY WEDNESDAY: We Just Missed Jonathan's Birthday!

Jonathan Richman at Meow Wolf, Santa Fe, NM
Nov. 5, 2016



The strange and wonderful Jonathan Richman turned 66 on Wacky Wednesday Eve, Tuesday May 16.

Richman and his band The Modern Lovers, in their early-'70s incarnation, was a pioneering post-garage, pre-punk band from New England. Richman was a Velvet Underground fanatic, though his own vision was much less dark and far more whimsical.

By the end of the '70s Richman's sound was getting softer, more acoustic, more chidlike, Through the years he's stayed true to his oddball vision.

A personal note: Back in 1998 I got to open for Jonathan when he played in Santa Fe. Truly one of the highlights of my own tacky music career.

Below are some of my favorite Jonathan tunes.

Here's one from one his frequent appearances on Late Night with Conan O'Brien in the early '90s.


And here's another Conan performance.  Everybody loves those vampire girls.



Going back to 1987, here's a tribute to Jonathan's favorite Marx brother.



Gregg Turner does a fine cover of this Jonathan favorite.



Speaking of people who've covered Jonathan, here are a couple of versions of Modern Lovers songs, starting with an acoustic take on "Pablo Picasso" by Iggy Pop.



And here's Joan Jett singing Jonathan's song about New Mexico's state bird.


And here's the first Jonathan song I ever heard back in the mid '70s. It's still one of my favorites.



Drummer Tommy Larkins with Jonathan Richman at Meow Wolf last year



Sunday, May 14, 2017

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST




Sunday, May 14, 2017
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Kickin' Child by Dion
Right On You by Benjamin Booker
Why Have You Changed by Thee Vicars
Don't Go Messin' by The Molting Vultures
Typical Girls by The Slits
Acid Drops by Public Image Ltd
Straight from Hell by Destination Lonely
Mom by Joe West

Tubes World Tour by The Tubes
I Need Somebody by Deniz Tek & James Williamson
Never Far From Where the Wild Things Are by James Williamson & Lisa Kekaula
1848 Now! by The Mekons
Now by The Plimsouls
Your Auntie Grizelda by The Monkees
Triple Full Moon by The Ghost Wolves

My Wild Love by The Doors
Gonna Murder My Baby by Pat Hare
Still Rollin' by Left Lane Cruiser
The Trip of Kambo by O Lendario Chucrobillyman
Drunk on Destruction by Mark Lanegan
Light as a Feather by Afghan Whigs
Old Tape of Memories by Laino & Broken Seeds
Sweet Simple Life by Demolition Doll Rods

My World is Empty Without You by Lee Fields & The Expressions
Midnight Hauler by Eleni Mandell
My Happiness by Elvis Presley
My Way by Sid Vicious
Always by Leonard Cohen
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast! CLICK HERE

Friday, May 12, 2017

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST



Friday, May 12, 2017
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Buckaroo by Buck Owens
Every Kind of Music But Country by Robbie Fulks
Kangaroo Blues by Cliff Bruner's Texas Wanderers
Big Shoes by Faron Young
Railroad of Sin by Sturgill Simpson
Shooting Star from Texas by Wayne Hancock
Holy Ghost Rock 'n' Roller by Jesse Dayton
Life of a Fool by Paul Burch
Nightmare of a Woman by Deke Dickerson
I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry by Little Richard
Rainmaker by Tusker

Dust on Mother's Bible by Buck Owens
Kit Kat Clock by The Bottle Rockets
700,000 Rednecks by Nikki Lane
Old Timer by Willie Nelson
About to Find Out by Margo Price
Slide Off of Your Satin Sheets by D.M. Bob & The Deficits
My Bucket's Got a Hole in It by Jawbone
Still Around by Scott H. Biram
I Will Survive by Peter Stampfel & The Ether Frolic Mob

It Makes No Difference by Shannon McNally
Nobody to Blame by Chris Stapleton
The End by Peter Case
The Dust I Own by Laino & Broken Seeds
High, Low and Lonesome by The Dinosaur Truckers
Stranger in Town by Dave Alvin
Good Ship Venus by Loudon Wainwright III

Trouble by Lauria
All Apologies by Iron Horse
Fairfax Story by David Bromberg
Same God by Calamity Cubes
I Bid You Goodnight by Any Old Time String Band
CLOSING THEME: Comin' Down by The Meat Puppets


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Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast! CLICK HERE
Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

Thursday, May 11, 2017

TERRELL'S TUNE-UP: Musical Gems from the Counterculture

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
May 12, 2017



You can’t really talk about the counterculture without talking about the music. It’s one-third of the mystic voodoo trinity of sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll.

So, in honor of the Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest exhibit, which opens Sunday at the Museum of New Mexico, below are some of my favorite counterculture songs in human history.

I’ve purposely avoided overused, overplayed selections — “White Rabbit,” “Born to Be Wild” — that you always hear on era soundtracks, oldies radio, and cheesy ’60s compilations. Behind the usual choices are some overlooked diamonds.

Let’s start with a couple of contributions from New Mexico:

The Mighty Tusker,
Left to right: Eliza Gilkyson, Steve Lindsey, Dennis Overman,
Baird Banner, Dennis Culver and David Gilliland
* “Rainmaker” by Tusker. This was a band of local hippie types, featuring the vocals of longtime Retrospecto. It sounds as refreshing now as it did back then.
favorite daughter Eliza Gilkyson, plus Santa Fe music stalwarts like Dennis Overman, David Gilliland, Baird Banner, Steve Lindsey, and Dennis Culver. Overman still says Tusker is his favorite band. I thought I’d heard “Rainmaker” on local radio back in the late ’60s or early ’70s, but I guess, like Alex Jones, I’ve had so many big bowls of chile that my memory’s shot. It wasn’t actually recorded until the mid-’70s. Still, this tune, written and sung by Gilkyson, belongs on any list of great counterculture songs. “Rainmaker, where did all your dancers go?/Did we lose them one and all just like we lost your buffalo?” Then the chorus: “We can dance, people, bring that rain down from the sky/We don’t have to let the land go hungry or run dry/We can dance and bring Rainmaker back before we die.” Overman recently recalled, “I remember we played it at Paolo Soleri ... which was actually risky at an outdoor venue. ... That song made it rain a few times.” After being out of print for decades, Gilkyson included it on her 2005 rarities album Retrospecto. It sounds as refreshing now as it did back then.

* "I Wanna Come Back (From The World of LSD)” by The Fe-Fi-Four Plus 2. Though they never became famous, a bunch of Albuquerque kids created one of the first — and one of the finest — psychedelic songs ever released. And it was recorded at Norman Petty Studios in Clovis, where a decade before, Buddy Holly worked his magic. The band, originally known as the Playmates, played at teen dances all over the state and even opened for nationally known bands like The Yardbirds and Question Mark & The Mysterians. Their guitar player, Eddie Garcia, had been a member of The Champs (“Tequila!”). In an interview a few years ago in the online Lance Monthly (published by Dick Stewart, owner of Albuquerque’s Lance Records, which released the song), keyboardist Victor Roybal said, “We were looking for a new and original sound. Much of what we had been doing [was] performing top 40 sounds which people requested to hear. Danny [Houlihan, the singer] came up with the song and we all liked the sound.” For my money, “World of LSD” was even more powerful than psychedelic anthems like The Strawberry Alarm Clock’s “Incense and Peppermints” or The Electric Prunes’ “I Had Too Much To Dream (Last Night).” Houlihan didn’t have “too much to dream.” He sounded like a kid scared out of his wits by hallucinations. Or maybe not. Roybal told Lance Weekly, “After the release of the 45-rpm [on Lance Records], the song was characterized as ‘anti-drug.’ I don’t think that was the intent, however.”



* “Coo Coo” by Big Brother & The Holding Company. This is a mysterious old minor-key
British folk song turned into a blistering psychedelic jam by Janis Joplin and her undeservedly underrated band. On some live versions that have surfaced, Janis doesn’t even sing until the second verse, which comes well after the halfway point. I’m firmly in the camp that believes Janis never should have left the ragged-but-righteous Big Brother. This song gives ammunition to that argument.

* “Livin’ With the Animals” by Mother Earth. This was a classic hippie band from the Bay Area that never quite made it that big, though singer Tracy Nelson was sometimes touted as the next Janis Joplin. But this tune, the title song of their first album, was sung and written by Texas-born Powell St. John, who also wrote songs for the 13th Floor Elevators. It’s a funny blues, complete with electric fiddle. The protagonist reminds me of some hapless R. Crumb character, a poor dude who’s the target of con artists, neighborhood toughs and an unfaithful girlfriend who’s “got some other sucker in her bed.”





* “Fat Angel” by Jefferson Airplane. Donovan wrote this one, reportedly about Mama Cass Elliott, Bless Its Pointed Little Head.
and in it, he name-checked the Airplane: “Fly Jefferson Airplane, get you there on time.” The Airplane returned the favor by covering the song, making it tougher and less droney, the first recorded version appearing on the live album





* “Mercy I Cry City” by The Incredible String Band. Speaking of Donovan, I bet you thought that he made the hippiest, dippiest, trippiest British music of the 1960s. Not even close. That honor would fall to the dynamic duo of Robin Williamson and Mike Heron, better known as The Incredible String Band. And when they were good, they were wonderful. Their album The Hangman’s Beautiful Daughter was their masterpiece, and the best song on it is “Mercy,” which sounds like a jug-band song as performed by Druids who’ve been listening to Ravi Shankar and English Music Hall 78s.


* “What’s Become of the Baby” by The Grateful Dead. When you’re talking about the
counterculture, the Grateful Dead is beyond obvious. Probably no other band is so closely associated with the movement. You could argue that a better-known song like the hippie-go-lucky “Truckin,’ ” or maybe “Sugar Magnolia,” better represents the group’s contributions to the era far more than this dark, dreary, near-unlistenable eight-minute drug dirge. But “What’s Become of the Baby,” with its distorted, meandering vocals, weird background noises, and a pace that’s excruciatingly slow — even for the dadgum Grateful Dead! — shows the group at its most sonically experimental. And the mostly unintelligible lyrics seem to hint at something tragic or maybe even evil (“But where is the child who played with the sunshine and chased the cloud shape to the regions of mind?”).Was this some crib death the commune covered up? Perhaps a Satanic sacrifice? A strange metaphor you can’t quite figure out? Really, what happened to this damned kid?

Enjoy many of these hallowed hippie sounds on this YouTube playlist:





TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

Sunday, May 21, 2017 KSFR, Santa Fe, NM Webcasting! 10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM Emai...