Sunday, March 31, 2013

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

Terrell's Sound World Facebook Banner
Sunday, March 31, 2013 
KSFR, Santa Fe, N.M. 
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell
Webcasting!
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

 OPENING THEME: Let it Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Motorhead with Me by Nobunny
Rock 'n' Roll Victim by Death
Detoit Breakdown by The Gories

IMG_0868

I Need Somebody / Got To by Question Mark & The Mysterians
Question Mark Interview (Avasilable online HERE)
96 Tears by Aretha Franklin
Question Mark Interview conclusion



Howlin' For My Woman by King Salami & The Cumberland 3
Geraldine by The A-Bones
Mama Get the Hammer by Barrence Whitfield
Bad Rap by Joe "King" Carrasco & The Crowns
Break the Spell by Gogol Bordello
Bonnie by The Rodeo Carburettor
Hold by Hips by Dengue Fever
Peter Cottontail by The Bubbadinos

Sal-a-Faster by Swamp Dogg
Swamp Dogg's Hot Spot by Andre Williams
After the Rain by Mission of Burma
Woman by Jim Carrol with Lee Renaldo, Lenny Kaye and Anton Sanco
Run Through the Jungle by Link Wray
Murder in My Heart for the Judge by Moby Grape
96 Tears by Big Maybelle
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Saturday, March 30, 2013

A Song for Every Year in My Life


My friend Chuck sent an e-mail yesterday to a select group of cronies telling how another friend of his, who will turn 50 this year, made a list of his favorite songs for every year he's been alive. Chuck decided to try it himself and issued a challenge for us to do the same.

I grumbled at first because I have 10 years on all these guys. But in the end I couldn't resist.

So here's what I came up with:


1953 How Much is That Doggy in the Window by Patti Page (OK, I had crappy taste before I turned one!)
1954 Work with Me Annie by Hank Ballard & The Midnighters
1955 16 Tons by Tennessee Ernie Ford
1956 Heartbreak Hotel by Elvis Presley
1957 Peggy Sue by Buddy Holly
1958 Yakety Yak by The Coasters
1959 Mack the Knife by Bobby Darin



1960 He'll Have to Go by Jim Reeves
1961 Baby It's You by The Shirrels
1962 Having a Party by Sam Cooke
1963 Hot Pastrami With Mashed Potatoes by Joey Dee & The Starlighters
1964 Rag Doll by The Four Seasons
1965 Satisfaction by The Rolling Stones
1966 96 Tears by Question Mark & The Mysterians
1967 White Rabbit by The Jefferson Airplane
1968 Born to Be Wild by Steppenwolf
1969 Born on the Bayou by Creedence Clearwater Revival


1970 Instant Karma by John Lennon
1971 Someday We'll Look Back by Merle Haggard
1972 Freddy's Dead by Curtis Mayfield
1973 Sail on Sailor by The Beach Boys
1974 I'm a Ramblin' Man by Waylon Jennings
1975 Gloria  by Patti Smith
1976 Isn't She Lovely by Stevie Wonder
1977 Psycho Killer by The Talking Heads
1978 The Beat by Elvis Costello & The Attractions
1979 Rock Lobster by The B52s



1980 Hot Head by Captain Beefheart & The Magic Band
1981 Marie, Marie by The Blasters
1982 Mexican Radio by Wall of Voodoo
1983 In a Big Country by Big Country
1984 Sharkey's Day by Laurie Anderson
1985 Don't Slander Me by Roky Erikson
1986 The Old Main Drag by The Pogues
1987 One Time, One Night by Los Lobos
1988 Love and Mercy by Brian Wilson
1989 The Future by Prince



1990 Bikini Girls with Machine Guns by The Cramps
1991 Jack Pepsi by TAD
1992 Youth Against Fascism by Sonic Youth
1993 50 ft Queenie by P.J. Harvey
1994 Where Did You Sleep Last Night by Nirvana
1995 Plenty Tuff and Union Made by The Waco Brothers
1996 The Curse of Milhaven by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
1997 Dancing With the Women at the Bar by Whiskeytown
1998 Tallacatcha by Alvin Youngblood Hart
1999 Filipino Box Spring Hog by Tom Waits


2000 Cast No Shadows by The Mekons
2001 Ruination day by Gillian Welch
2002 No Confidence by Simon Stokes
2003 Sink Hole by Drive-By Truckers
2004 Be My Love by NRBQ
2005 Goin' on Down to the BBQ by Drywall
2006 My Eyes by Tony Gilkyson
2007 American Wedding by Gogol Bordello
2008 Wreck My Flow by The Dirtbombs
2009 Lover's Curse by The A-Bones



BARRENCE WHITFIELD & THE SAVAGES


2010 Psycho by Nick Curran & The Lowlifes
2011 It's Mighty Crazy by Barrence Whitfield & The Savages
2012 Black Mold by Jon Spencer Blues Explosion



Try it yourself and feel free to post in comments section.

Update 8:38 p.m. Just noticed that I'd left out 1985 in original version. Sorry, Roky! Also I corrected the "126 Tons" that a couple of folks were kind enough to point out.

Friday, March 29, 2013

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST


Santa Fe Opry Facebook BannerFriday, March 29, 2013 
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM 
Webcasting! 
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell 
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org
 OPENING THEME: Buckaroo by Buck Owens & The Buckaroos
Red Red Robin by Rosie Flores
Polka de Nalgas by The Imperial Rooster
Big Time by The Howlin' Brothers
Scobie's Dream by Roger Knox & The Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Sunshine Special by Roy Acuff
My Old Man Boogie by The Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band
Hog-tied Over You by Tennessee Ernie Ford & Ella Mae Morse
Sure-Fire Kisses by Goldie Hill & Justin Tubb
She's My Five Foot Five by Joel Savoy
Owls by The Handsome Family

Cappuccino Boogie by Wayne Hancock
Ramblin' Man by Waylon Jennings
Wild and Lonesome by Shooter Jennings with Patty Griffin
Honey You Had Me Fooled by The Defibulators
And in Time by Country Blues Revue
Saved by The Band
Lament by The Gourds
The Man That Wrestles the Bear by Southern Culture on the Skids

Old Spur Line by Legendary Shack Shakers
Drinkin' My Baby Goodbye by Charlie Daniels
Much Too Young for Young by Barney Burcham
Root Beer by Buck Owens
Whiskey by Scott H. Biram
If You Don't Love the Lord by The Beaumonts
Muleskinner Blues by The Cramps
I Just Can't Let You Play Goodbye by Willie Nelson
Don't Remember Me by The Misery Jackals

She Even Woke Me Up to Say Goodbye by Swamp Dogg
Huckleberry Blues by Otis Taylor
The Sunny Side of the Moon by Johnny Dilks & The Vistacion Valley Boys
8:05 by Carla Olson & Peter Case
Kansas Waltz by The Calamity Cubes
Were You There When They Crucified My Lord by Johnny Cash
The Pilgrim by Steve Earle
CLOSING THEME: Comin' Down by The Meat Puppets

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Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

TERRELL'S TUNEUP: Swamp Dogg Rising

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
March 29, 2013

Great news for fans of the soul man known as Swamp Dogg: Alive/Naturalsound records has just re-released Mr. Dogg’s first two albums, Total Destruction to Your Mind and Rat On! Both have been out of print for years.

I know there are members of the cult of Swamp Dogg among my readership. But there’s a good chance that the vast majority of readers have no idea who he is.

Born Jerry Williams in Portsmouth, Virginia, more than 70 years ago, he began recording in the mid-1950s under the name of Little Jerry and later “Little Jerry Williams.” His Swamp Dogg persona didn’t emerge until 1970 with Total Destruction to Your Mind. Rat On! followed the next year.

Despite having a wonderful, sometimes piercing high voice, Swamp Dogg managed never to become a mainstream success. His biggest success is probably being the co-writer — along with fellow soul-belter Gary “U.S.” Bonds — of “She’s All I Got,” a huge country hit for Johnny Paycheck in the early ’70s.

But Swamp Dogg was intent on forging his own path in the music world. Years before it was fashionable, he bolted the big labels and started his own independent company, Swamp Dogg Entertainment Group, even though that meant leaner record sales and relative obscurity.

Another possibility is that these albums didn’t go platinum because of the covers, which were punk-rock in spirit years before punk.

The cover of Total Destruction features a fuzzy photo of Swamp in his underwear with what might be a saucepan on his head, sitting on what looks like a garbage truck. Rat On! has a picture of Swamp Dogg wearing a snazzy black-and-white pimp cap and matching shirt and riding a large white rat the size of a horse.

(The strange, sometimes off-putting Swamp Dogg album covers never stopped. His 2003 record If I Ever Kiss It … He Can Kiss It Goodbye shows Swamp Dogg in a rather conservative suit surrounded by oversized disembodied tongues and lips. Then in 2007 there was Resurrection, which had a cover depicting the singer nailed to a cross, clad only in an U.S.-flag loincloth.)

But you can’t judge a record by the cover, so those who skipped the early Swamp Dogg records because of the album art did themselves a disservice. Especially when it comes to Total Destruction to Your Mind.

The title song opens the album, with Swamp making an overt “I Am the Walrus” reference (“Sittin’ on a corn flake …”). It’s an upbeat, gospel-infused tune, but despite the surreal lyrics and some subdued wah-wah guitar, I wouldn’t call this a “psychedelic” soul song as countless other writers have. It’s just good-time Southern soul. Swamp refers to “psychedelic music to blow my mind” in the next song, “Synthetic World.” But the music on this tune is sweet and mellow.

I can almost imagine the late Richard Manuel of The Band singing the song “The World Beyond,” a lament taking place in some post-apocalyptic reality. (Believe it or not, this was written by Bobby Goldsboro, most famous for the sap masterpieces “Honey” and “Broomstick Cowboy.”) And I’m not sure which reality “I Was Born Blue” came from. In the refrain, Swamp sings, “Why wasn’t I born with orange skin and green hair like the rest of the people in the world?”

One of the harder-edged tracks here is the slow-burning, swampy “Sal-a-Faster,” which starts out with Swamp confessing, “I just hafta always stay plastered …” But the song in which he seems to be having the most fun is “Redneck,” which was written by Joe South. That’s one of two South songs here, the other being “These Are Not My People,” which is about a young woman who falls victim to the temptations of the wild side of life.

Total Destruction ends with a couple of tunes that perhaps should have been called “The Paternity Suit Suite.” “The Baby Is Mine” is about tensions between a guy and his ex-love’s husband. “You can bet your life, she might be his wife/but the baby is mine,” Swamp sings. The next tune, “Mama’s Baby, Daddy’s Maybe,” is a straight-up blues about a “wild” woman married to a brown-eyed man who is worried whether his blue-eyed child is really his.

Rat On! starts out with “Do You Believe,” which has Swamp pondering the political landscape of the day. “Do you believe in the NAACP/Or the Ku Klux Klan/The Panther Party/or in Uncle Sam?”

But the theme changes to personal domestic matters in the next song. “Predicament #2” is about a guy with a loving wife and child as well as a mistress on the side. “One woman keeps my heart and the other keeps my family,” he sings.

Later in the album, he sings about a more unusual situation. “That Ain’t My Wife” is about a guy who walks into his old house and watches a couple making out on the couch. He leaves, gets some booze at a liquor store, and goes back to the house just to make sure.

Two of my favorite songs on Rat On! are covers. Swamp Dogg does a stirring version of The Bee Gees’ “I’ve Gotta Get a Message to You.” But even better is his soul-soaked take on a Mickey Newberry classic, “She Even Woke Me Up to Say Goodbye.” Right now I can’t decide whether I like this song best by Swamp Dogg or Jerry Lee Lewis.

Terrell questions Question Mark: I’m crying 96 tears of joy right now, because I will be doing a radio interview with the one and only Question Mark of Question Mark & The Mysterians on Sunday, March 31, on my radio show, Terrell’s Sound World.

Tune in for some words of wisdom from one of the founding fathers and unascended masters of what became known as garage rock. The show starts at 10 p.m., and the interview will begin about 10:15 p.m. That’s on KSFR-FM 101.1 and streaming live on the web at www.ksfr.org

Video Bonus:

Here's a fairly recent performance by Mr. Dogg:



The one time I got to see Swamp Dogg live, back in the late '90s I believe, this John Prine classic  was my favorite song he did. This version was recorded during the Iraq war:

Monday, March 25, 2013

Terrell Questions Question Mark on KSFR This Sunday

IMG_0887
Question Mark in NYC 2010

I'm crying 96 tears of joy right now.

This Sunday night,  I'll be doing a live radio interview of the one and only Question Mark of Question Mark & The Mysterians.

That's Sunday, March 31 on Terrell's Sound World, KSFR, 101.1 FM  and streamin' atcha, screamin' atcha at www.ksfr.org.

My show, as always, starts at 10 pm. The interview will start about 10:15 p.m.

If you miss it, you're gonna cry, cry, cry, cry ...

By the way, I kick off the latest Big Enchilada podcast with a live song by Question mark & The Mysterians.

Until then, enjoy a magical moment from the show I saw in New York in 2010, where the band was joined by Ronnie Spector.


Sunday, March 24, 2013

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST


Terrell's Sound World Facebook BannerSunday, March 24 , 2013 
KSFR, Santa Fe, N.M. 
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell
Webcasting!
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

 OPENING THEME: Let it Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Don't Break This Heart of Mine by Question Mark & The Mysterians
Little Girl by The Syndicate of Sound
Medication by The Standells
Red Hot by Sam the Sham & The Pharoahs
Miniskirt Blues by Simon Stokes & The Heathen Angels
(Your Love is Like a) Ramblin' Rose by Barrence Whitfield & The Savages
Do the Clam by The Cramps
What Hath God Wraught? by The Soledad Brothers
Poontang by The Treniers
Sit With the Guru by Strawberry Alarm Clock

Jump into the River by Roy Loney with The A-Bones
Skinny Minnie by The Sonics
Flea Market Rock by The Scrams
I'm a Hog For You Baby by Screaming Lord Sutch
Outrun the Law by The Things
Money Shot Man by Churchwood
All Kinds of Twisted by Acid Fascists
Old Folks Boogie by Jack Oblivian
Good Night, Sleep Tight by The Bloody Hollies

Mohawk by Chelsea Light Moving
Fisticuffs by Primus
What Was That by Dinosaur Jr
Civilized by The Rollins Band
After the Rain by Mission of Burma
Hippy Dippy Do by Rocket From the Crypt
Some Velvet Morning by The Frontier Circus

Total Destruction to Your Mind by Swamp Dogg
Directly From My Heart to You by Frank Zappa featuring Don "Sugarcane" Harris
Plastic Man by The Temptations
Holy Rock by Rev. Bill Grady
Curtain Falls by Bobby Darrin
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Saturday, March 23, 2013

Finally, the New Big Enchilada for Your Listening Pleasure



There's something sinister about this midway attraction. Step right up to the Felonious Fun House, where scuzzy carnival fun turns into a journey to the Beyond. And just when think it's over, it's time to take the funhouse slide down into the wild realm of psychedelic Africa.



Here's the playlist:

(Background Music: Dance of the Hours by Spike Jones)
Girl, You Captivate Me by Question Mark & The Mysterians *
Strange Movie by The Troggs
One Way Ride by Raunch Hands
Duende by Churchwood
Albuquerque Freakout by Holy Wave

(Background Music: Hell's Caroussel by Abormalace)
Ooga Booga Rock by Hipbone Slim & The Knee-Tremblers
Take it Off by Midnight Woolf
Silver Monkey by The Copper Gamins
That's My Girl by The Monks
We Kill Evil by Pocket FishRmen
Keg Party at the Muldoon Farm (Ultimate Mix) by Joe West

(Background Music: The Circus Machine by Ron Perovich)

Psychedelic Africa Set

Okponmo Ni Tsitsi Emo Le by The Psychedelic Aliens
Adieu by Ofege
Allah Wakbarr by Ofo & The Black Company
Babalawo by The Thermometers
Acid Rock by The Funkees

Lots of the music from this set comes from Soundway Records, in particular the albums The World Ends: Afro Rock & Psychedelia in 1970s Nigeria and Nigeria Rock Special: Pyschedelic Afro-Rock & Jazz Funk in 1970s Nigeria. If you liked this set, these albums would be a great place to start exploring more.
* My interview with Question Mark can be heard HERE 

Note: There's some kind of problem with my Mevio Feed beyond my limited comprehension. So those of who are are subscribed, might not get this episode until we figure that out. Meanwhile, I've posted up it up on my Mixcloud page, where you also can find several of my KSFR radio shows.

Play the episode below




Friday, March 22, 2013

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST


Santa Fe Opry Facebook BannerFriday, March 22, 2013 
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM 
Webcasting! 
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell 
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org
 OPENING THEME: Buckaroo by Buck Owens & The Buckaroos
Ride by Wayne Hancock
Banana Pudding by Southern Culture on the Skids
Do Right by Lydia Loveless
Take Me Lake Charles by Shinyribs
Bottle of Wine by Angry Johnny & The Killbilles
Honky Tonk Merry Go-Round by Kelli-Jones Savoy &Emma Young
If You Ain't Lovin (You Ain't Livin') by Faron Young
Motorcycle Man by The Riptones
Honky Tonk Heros by Billy Joe Shaver

Best Liquor Store by The Hickoids
Trouble in Mind by Jon Langford & The Pine Valley Cosmonauts
LSD by T. Tex Edwards & Out on Parole
West Wind by Jayke Orvis & The Broken Band
Flying Saucer Song/A Hard Lesson to Learn by Shooter Jennings
The Savior by The Imperial Rooster
Rainbow Stew by Jason Ringenberg


I Ain't Drunk by Whitey Morgan & The 78s
I Wanna Be Your Mama Agian by Mother Earth
Lou's Got the Flu by Roger Miller
Lucky That Way by Dwight Yoakam
This is How We Do Things in the Country by Slim Cessna's Auto Club
Barstool Mountain by Johnny Paycheck
Should'a Killed My Baby by The Dirty Charley Band
The Blues Chose Me by Country Blues Revue

Satellite of Love by DM Bob & The Deficits
Evenin' Breeze by Dan Hicks & His Hot Licks
20/20 by The Goddamn Gallows
Two Angels by Peter Case
Don't Touch Me by Eleni Mandel
Hold on to the House by Terry Allen
CLOSING THEME: Comin' Down by The Meat Puppets

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Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

Thursday, March 21, 2013

TERRELL'S TUNEUP: Thurston's New Sonic Blast

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
March. 22, 2013

This is the closest thing you’re going to hear to a new Sonic Youth album in the foreseeable future.

I’m talking about the new self-titled album by a band called Chelsea Light Moving, headed by Sonic Youth singer-guitarist Thurston Moore. The group is named after a New York moving company that was run by composer Philip Glass before he got famous.

Moore and bassist Kim Gordon announced in late 2011 that their marriage was over and that the band, which had been exploring the furthest reaches of feedback screech for 30-some years, would be going on “hiatus” after it finished its tour. Except for an avant-garde project Moore and Gordon did with Yoko Ono that was released last year, we haven’t heard much of a peep from them since.

But earlier this month, Moore and his new cronies came banging in with this album. Had I heard songs like “Burroughs” or “Sleeping Where I Fall” without first knowing anything about the project, I would have just assumed it was some Sonic Youth material I’d never heard before.

In fact, it’s a huge relief to old fans that it sounds nothing like the folky, heavy-on-the-strings, look-ma-no-feedback, airy-fairy Demolished Thoughts, Moore’s most recent solo album.

With the opening song, “Heavenmetal,” I was afraid Moore might be heading back toward that Demolished Thoughts state of mind. There are no harps or violins, just a laid-back acoustic tune with New Agey proclamations like “Be a warrior. Love life.” I guess he’s just trying to align his chakras and be the best Thurston he can be.

Luckily, he and the band come roaring back in the next song, “Sleeping Where I Fall,” which starts off quietly but slowly builds to SY-like intensity.

One of my favorites is the roughly eight-minute tune “Alighted.” It goes through all sorts of changes in tone and tempo, including a fierce brontosaurus-rock interlude right before Moore’s vocals come in (nearly halfway through the song).

This is followed by “Empires of Time,” another excursion into discordant craziness, with Moore declaring “We are the third eye of rock ‘n’ roll!” I’m not sure who the pounding “Groovy & Linda” is about, but it is centered around the line “Don’t shoot — we are your children.” It takes this old hippie back to the days of Kent State.

In “Burroughs,” Moore pays tribute to Naked Lunch author William S. Burroughs, singing, “Ah, Billy, the sweetest drug is free/Will you, Billy, shoot it into me?”

“Mohawk” features Moore reciting poetry instead of singing. Toward the end of the track, he invokes the memory of the late singer of The Germs, an early Los Angeles punk group: “Darby Crash came back from England with a mohawk, though he might have referred to it as a ‘Mohican’/Your laugh stays with me. It’s not the first time.”

The memory of Mr. Crash is further honored in the last song, a high-charged cover of The Germs’ “Communist Eyes.”

Chelsea Light Moving isn’t exactly an album for the ages. Though Moore’s bandmates are all fine musicians, guitarist Keith Wood is no Lee Ranaldo. And if Samara Lubelski has anything resembling Gordon’s snarling aura, it doesn’t come out on the record.

A larger problem is that with Moore handling all the vocal duties, old fans probably will miss the vocal variety of his old group, in which Ranaldo and Gordon also contributed lead vocals.

But it’s an enjoyable romp for those who have followed Moore all these years. If Sonic Youth can’t go home again, this is a tasty, if not completely satisfying, consolation prize.

Sonic nostalgia: Sonic Youth was a wonderful thing. The group sprung out of New York in the early ’80s, heavily influenced by the avant-garde post-punk No Wave scene. It started getting mainstream attention with 1988’s Daydream Nation, rode the Nirvana-era alt-rock scare and braved on, true to its vision for nearly two more decades.
Kim Gordon with Sonic Youth
Denver 1994

Like The Beach Boys, who never changed their name to The Beach Men, Sonic Youth remained forever Youth well after the band and most of its fans reached middle age.

I got to see the group four times in four different cities.

I caught them in Denver in 1995 when they were headlining Lollapolooza and working their then-current album, Washing Machine.

Two years later, I was at the Freedom Tibet show in New York, where they played mostly long instrumentals.

The following year, I caught them in Austin at South by Southwest, where they previewed material from A Thousand Leaves. The show was far better than the album. In the next couple of days, I happened to be in two different barbecue joints where Sonic Youth was eating. (I wasn’t stalking, honest.)

But the best Sonic Youth show I ever saw was in Santa Fe in the summer of 1999. In a tent.

It was for SITE Santa Fe’s third international biennial, back in the days when SITE had artsy rockers for fundraisers during that event. (Patti Smith and Laurie Anderson had performed in connection with previous biennial shows.)

The night before, in Austin, someone stole Sonic Youth’s rented Ryder truck full of instruments and equipment, so the band had to rent all of that to perform.

Then Moore got irked when he found out that tickets for the show were $50, which would exclude a lot of fans. The group demanded that kids from Warehouse 21 next door be let in for $1. (That’s what I remember. Some say the kids were let in for free.)

Suddenly the tent was shaking with dozens of sonic teens rocking out, and the band seemed to feed off that injection of energy.

Blog Bonus: 

Here's the song "Burroughs"

 

Sunday, March 17, 2013

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST


Terrell's Sound World Facebook BannerSunday, March 17, 2013 
KSFR, Santa Fe, N.M. 
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell
Webcasting!
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

 OPENING THEME: Let it Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Leave the Capitol by The Fall
When Irish Eyes are Smilin' by Frank Patterson
The Gentleman Soldier by The Pogues
Kiss me I'm IrishDrunken Lazy Bastard by The Mahones
I'll Tell Me Ma by Van Morrison & The Chieftains
The Rocky Road to Dublin by The Young Dubliners
A Bang on the Ear by The Waterboys

Brennan on the Moor by The Clancy Brothers
What's Left of the Flag by Flogging Molly
Captain Kelly's Kitchen by The Dropkick Murpheys
Donegal Express by Shane MacGowan & The Popes
Wild Rover by The Dropkick Murpheys with Shane MacGowan
Molly Malone by Sinead O'Connor
Breaking Through by Blood or Whiskey
Forty Deuce by Black 47

Albuquerque Freakout by Holy Wave
Weedey by Churchwood
I Need Somebody by Manby's Head
Psychologically Overcast by Fishbone
Tommy the Cat by Primus
Good Night for a Heart Attack by Nashville Pussy

Nantucket Girls Song by The Tossers
Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand by Detroit Cobras
Yeah Yeah by Georgie Fame
Rock 'n' Roll by Lou Reed
Blofonyobi Wo Atale by The Psychedelic Aliens
Black Plague Blues by Figures of Light
Rosettes by The Men They Couldn't Hang
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Friday, March 15, 2013

TERRELL'S TUNEUP: View From the Bottom

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican March 15, 2013

I was Googling Terry Allen the other night, looking for a recent interview I’d heard about. The Lubbock-born Santa Fe resident has just released Bottom of the World, his first CD of new material since 1999. At the top of the Google news page was a little web ad that read “Terry Allen’s records www.instantcheckmate.com Did you know Terry Allen’s criminal history is searchable?”

How’s that for outlaw cred? No, I didn’t run Allen’s name through 
the search. I seriously doubt that it has anything on the artist. And even 
if it did, I’m sure it wouldn’t be nearly as interesting as the record of 
his records.

You can’t call Allen a prolific musician — he’s just a henchman of his weird muse, which often commands him to work in other mediums, such as sculpture, painting, theater, and multimedia installation.

The albums he has released since the 1970s are full of poignant stories, hard-eyed observations, sardonic wit, unforgettable characters, and occasionally some righteous rage.

The first thing that Allen fans might notice on the new record is that it seems more somber and quieter than most of his others. There are no raucous roadhouse rockers like you find on earlier records. Here the songs tend to be slow, the melodies are mostly sad, and the lyrics are clear — and they often sting. It’s the kind of album you have to sit 
down and listen to.

Do it. It’s worth it.

Except for Allen’s keyboards, this is basically an acoustic affair with longtime Lubbock crony Lloyd Maines adding some guitar and steel guitar; Richard Bowden, another longtime Allen collaborator, on fiddle; Brian Standefer on cello; and Allen’s son Bukka on accordion and B3 organ. Bukka’s wife, Sally Allen, does harmony vocals on some tunes.

Bottom of the World starts out in familiar territory. The opening track, “Four Corners,” is a new version of an old song that originally appeared on Allen’s 1975 debut album, Juarez (which a wise critic once described as “a breathtaking tour of the underbelly of the Southwest, the barrooms, the whorehouses, the trailer parks, and the highways by hard-bitten and not entirely lovable characters”). It’s a bittersweet memory of a lost love and a wistful way to open the new album. After nearly 40 years, the song (as well as the entire Juarez album) has aged quite well.

“Four Corners” is followed by “Queenie’s Song,” which Allen co-wrote with Guy Clark more than a decade ago. It appeared on Clark’s 2002 album The Dark. This is the story of a crime that took place in Santa Fe. On New Year’s Day in 1999, Allen’s dog Queenie, who had been missing, was found shot to death. “Bet you got a gun for Christmas/That don’t make it right/What in the hell were you thinkin’/With little Queenie in your sights,” Allen sings, the anger still in his voice. It makes me pig-bitin’ mad too. I hope the jerk who shot Allen’s dog is reading this.

But this is only the beginning. Allen’s new songs show he’s still got the knack. “Do They Dream of Hell in Heaven” would tickle the ghosts of Mark Twain and William Blake. “Do they dream of hell in heaven?/Do they regret how hard they’ve tried/Wish now they’d been much more sinful/And repented just a minute before they died?” Here he raises an important theological question: “Is there something strange about heaven they just don’t want you to know?”He ends the song with the image of “the golden gates of forever” closing “tight on all the fun.”

Some of the best songs on this album show earthly situations in which fun doesn’t seem like an option. “Emergency Human Blood Courier” wouldn’t sound out of place in a sequel to Juarez. In an ominous minor-key Mexican-style melody, Allen speaks the lyrics: “Emergency human-blood courier headed south down to Mexico/Where there’s been a whole lot of bleeding, and there’s going to be a whole lot more/Emergency human-blood courier in a vehicle red as nails/Haulin’ blood down to the borderlines/Where all systems seem to have failed.”

The album’s biggest punch in the gut is “The Gift,” a song ripped from the headlines. It was apparently inspired by the suicide of Wall Street swindler Bernie Madoff’s eldest son, who hanged himself in December 2010, on the second anniversary of his father’s arrest. “Ah, oooh, it’s a gift from daddy,” Allen sings. “Everything you see, is daddy’s.” In the last verse he describes the suicide — how Mark Madoff put his young son to bed and then went and hanged himself in the kitchen doorway. “It’s a gift from daddy/He lost all he had, and he gave it to you.”

While “The Gift” might leave you feeling bleak, Allen ends the album with two songs of love and commitment. “Sidekick Anthem” assures a friend that “I’m just a call away.” Then the last track, “Covenant (for Jo Harvey),” is a sweet love song for his wife of five decades. Some of the people he sings about in Bottom of the World have indeed hit bottom. Allen may empathize with them, but he knows he’s got a refuge.

BLOG BONUS:

Here's a song from Bottom of the World



And here's one from Terry's show on Santa Fe's Plaza last summer

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Imperial Rooster Has New Album

Espanola's beloved underground country jug-punk band The Imperial Rooster has finished a new album.
The Imperial Rooster Live at The Cowgirl 12-11-10

I'm not sure when they're releasing it though. Yesterday the band tweeted, "We also might release our new album Cluckaphony this week. We're kinda goofy like that."

I won't argue their goofiness.

But while we're waiting on the album, the Roosters have in recent days released a bunch of videos for the online Couch by Couchwest "festival."

Here's three of those. I hadn't heard these songs before, so I'm assuming they're on the new album.:








You can find all the band's videos HERE.

Monday, March 11, 2013

FREE MUSIC FROM FARMAGEDDON



The Calamity Cubes
The Calamity Cubes in Austin
The Farmageddon Records Festival, which is taking place in Montana in late July, is offering a free MP3 sampler featuring the music of bands and singers who are on the schedule.

Among the 21 artists on the sampler are Slim Cessna's Auto Club, The Calamity Cubes, The Ugly Valley Boys, The Goddamn Gallows and Black-Eyed Vermillion.

The download link is HERE. Enjoy.



The Goddamn Gallows in Santa Fe
The Goddamn Gallows in Santa Fe



Sunday, March 10, 2013

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST


Terrell's Sound World Facebook BannerSunday, March 10, 2013 
KSFR, Santa Fe, N.M. 
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell
Webcasting!
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

 OPENING THEME: Let it Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Don't Tease Me by Question Mark & The Mysterians
Keels Be Damned by Churchwood
Strychnine by The Sonics
Train Crash by The Molting Vultures
Catastrophe by Mark Sultan
Johnny's Got a Gun by Dead Moon
Falling Off the Face of the Earth by The Electric Mess
American Music by The Blasters

If I Should Fall From the Grace of God by Shane McGowan & The Popes
Communist Eyes by Chelsea Light Moving
Nightingale by The Copper Gamins
Cocaine Blues by Wayne Kramer & The Pink Fairies
I'll Make You Happy by The Ugly Beats
I'm Going to Bring a Watermelon to My Girl Tonight by The Bonzo Dog Band
Martin Scorsese by King Missile


AFRICAN PSYCHEDELIA 

Rough Rider by The Hygrades
Pardon by Orchestre Poly-Rhthmo
Love's a Real Thing by Super Eagles
Adieu by Ofege
Chokoi & Oreje by The Elcados
Sorry Bamba by Possy
Ekassa 31 by Victor Uwaifo



Blue Rain in Africa by Otis Taylor
Shoot the Freak by Lovestruck
The Ballad of Dwight Fry/Sun Arise by Alice Cooper
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Friday, March 08, 2013

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST


Santa Fe Opry Facebook BannerFriday, March 8, 2013 
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM 
Webcasting! 
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell 
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org
 OPENING THEME: Buckaroo by Buck Owens & The Buckaroos
Cajun Stripper by Doug Kershaw
Keep on Truckin' by Hot Tuna
The New World by Texas Sapphires
Coulda Shoulda Woulda by J.P.McDermott & Western Bop
There Stands the Glass by Gal Holiday
Hot Tamale Pete by Bob Skyles & His Sky Rockets
Cool Front by Electric Rag Band
Your Face or Mine by Pure Luck
I Got Texas in My Soul by Tex Williams & His Western Caravan
Then I'll Be Moving On by Mother Earth

Hard-Hearted Hannah by Cliff "Ukulele Ike" Edwards
Nothing at All by The Waco Brothers
I Push Right Over by Robbie Fulks
The White Trash Song by Shooter Jennings with Scott H. Biram
The Beautiful Waitress by Austin Lounge Lizards
Sidekick Anthem by Terry Allen
American Trash by Betty Dylan

Trucks, Tractors and Trains by The Dirt Daubers
Fool's Hall of fame by Johnny Cash
Anchor's the Way by The Calamity Cubes
And In Time by Country Blues Revue
Blah Blah Baby by Zeno Tornado & The Boney Google Brothers
I Like Drinking by The Gourds
The Land Where the Crow Flies Backwards by Roger Knox & The Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Your Heart Turned Left (And I Was on the Right) by Don Rich
TV Party by Asylum Street Spankers
Cathead Biscuits and Gravy by Nancy Apple & Rob McNurlin

Let's Invite Them Over by John Prine & Iris DeMent
Waltz Acroaa Texas by Ernest Tubb
The Winner by Bobby Bare
What Ya Doing in Memphis by Jason Ecklund
Louise by Ramblin' Jack Elliott & Tom Waits
CLOSING THEME: Comin' Down by The Meat Puppets

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Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

Thursday, March 07, 2013

TERRELL'S TUNEUP: Fresh Sounds from Churchwood & Copper Gamins

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
March 8, 2013

Coming straight from the deep Euphrates — actually Austin, Texas — is the nonslumping sophomore effort by the band known as Churchwood. The CD, called 2, appropriately enough, proves that the group’s self-titled first album was no fluke.

Both albums are steeped in the blues. Churchwood is tight and capable, but nobody is going to confuse the band with the generic Texas Stevie Ray Vaughanabe groups. “Saving the blues from the blahs” is a motto found on Churchwood’s ReverbNation page, but that barely scratches the surface.

Fronted by singer Joe Doerr, whose day job is English professor, Churchwood has a definite literary edge. The first words Doerr sings on the opening track, “Duende,” tip you off to that.

“Coming straight from the deep Euphrates/Orfeo’s gift from the realm of Hades/Don’t look back, baby, take his hand/Gonna lead us all to the promised land,” Doerr shouts over jungle drums and a guitar riff that lands somewhere between Howlin’ Wolf and Nirvana’s “Serve the Servants.”

Don’t think these guys are all that highbrow. For instance, on one verse of “Weedeye,” Doerr declares, “Mushroom tea, razor blade, I’m going down to Mississippi ’cause I gotta get laid.” The refrain of the song is “We don’t have to anything ’cept live ’til we die,” an expression Doerr says he picked up from his dad (whenever his mom told him he had to do something).

Writing about the origins of Churchwood on The Rock Garage website, Doerr says longtime Austin-band veteran guitarist Bill Anderson — with whom he played in a couple of groups in the ’80s — approached him in 2007 about starting a new band. “Bill envisioned taking Captain Beefheart’s Spotlight Kid/Clear Spot as a point of departure and using it as a means of exploring the musical and lyrical interests that he and I have shared for the past 25 years or so: blues, punk, country, psychedelic, and so on.”

(Anderson, by the way, works by day for the Texas Legislative Council, a job this political reporter can relate to. He was also a member of The Meat Purveyors, one of the cool- est country/punk bands ever — something I can relate to even more.)

Fortified by a second guitarist, Billysteve Korpi, and an explosive rhythm section (Adam Kahan on bass and drummer Julien Peterson), Churchwood is an authentic threat.

While blues is the band’s foundation, Churchwood subtly branches out on 2.

On “Aranzazu,” the musicians drop hints of a lilting jam-band vibe. “You Be the Mountain (I’ll Be Mohammad)” is funkified in a swampy kind of way (including some Princely falsetto vocals). “A Message From Firmin Desloge” and “Money Shot Man” feature a guest horn section, giving the former song a soul sheen and the latter an early Boz Scaggs feel.

Then there’s “Keels Be Damned,” on which the band displays a Threepenny Opera cabaret influence. Gogol Bordello could get away with playing this one.

The song advises against accepting the official version of anything. “I just can’t see what’s mad in asking proof of what we’re told/So I’ll be hangin’ here with minds that cannot be controlled.”

So don't take my word for it. Check Churchwood out yourself.

Also recommended:

Los Niños de Cobre by The Copper Gamins. In reviewing the five-song self-titled debut EP of this hopped-up punk-blues duo from the mountains of Mexico last year, I said that it sounded like it was recorded “in an abandoned gas station.” That basically holds true for this, the Copper Gamins’ first full-length album (17 songs, 55 minutes). And once again the lo-fi music is so loud I’m not sure how that gas station is holding up.

The Gamins — singer/guitarist José Carmen and drummer Claus Lafania — follow a line of blues-bashing twosomes, going back to the Flat Duo Jets through early Black Keys and White Stripes on up through The King Khan & BBQ Show. The lads from Mexico are less slick than any of those bands — far less slick than what the Stripes or Keys eventually evolved into, and unlike KK & BBQ, the Gamins have not yet discovered the magical joys of doo-wop.

For those who heard the EP, there are no huge surprises on Los Niños de Cobre. It has the same basic sound, but in a handful of tracks, the group shows some healthy restlessness by expanding its sound.

For instance, toward the end of “Silver Monkey,” Carmen plays a strange-sounding organ. It’s downright refreshing. But the biggest surprise is “Angelitos Negros,” the title song of the 1948 Mexican movie starring silver-screen lothario Pedro Infante. I hope on the group’s next album the musicians incorporate more sounds from their native land.

Technically this album won’t be available commercially until March 19, but you can hear three cuts at www.reverbnation.com/thecoppergamins .

BLOG BONUS

Got some videos ...



Here's the Copper Gamins in action a cople of years ago



And here's Pedro ...

Sunday, March 03, 2013

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST


Terrell's Sound World Facebook BannerSunday, March 3, 2013 
KSFR, Santa Fe, N.M. 
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell
Webcasting!
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

 OPENING THEME: Let it Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
I'm a Man by The Yardbirds
No Particular Place to Go by The Troggs
Happy Now by Lyres
We Kill Evil by Pocket FishRmen
Into the Drink by Mudhoney
Burroughs by Chelsea Light Moving
A Message from Fermin Deslodge by Churchwood
Make Her Cry by The Things

Second Hand Man by The Raunch Hands Bigg Topp
Free and Freaky by The Stooges
Stop It, You're Killing Me by The Hickoids
Silver Monkey by The Copper Gamins
Devil's Rope by Red Hot Rebellion
Seasons in the Sun by Too Much Joy
Hodad Makin' the Scene With a Six Pack by The Silly Surfers

Creep in the Cellar by The Butthole Surfers
The Beat by Elvis Costello & The Atrractions
Miss Phenomenal by King Automatic
Live With Me by The Rolling Stones
Gold on the Shore by Ty Segall
Dumb All Over by Frank Zappa
Fried Neckbones by King Khan & The Shrines
Cosma Shiva by Nina Hagen
Good Cheer by Mission of Burma

Jerry Was a Race Car Driver by Primus
Tower of Song by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
Mudflap Girl by Timbuk 3
Mystery of Love by Marianne Faithful
Way Down in the Hole by Compulsive Gamblers
I'm Sick and Tired of Picking Up After You by Tom Waits & Crystal Gayle
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Friday, March 01, 2013

THE SANTA FE OPRY PLAYLIST


Santa Fe Opry Facebook BannerFriday, March 1, 2013 
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM 
Webcasting! 
10 p.m. to midnight Fridays Mountain Time 
Host: Steve Terrell 
101.1 FM
email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org
 OPENING THEME: Buckaroo by Buck Owens & The Buckaroos
Oh You Pretty Woman by Milton Brown & His Musical Brownies
Only Daddy That'll Walk the Line by Buck Owens
I Washed My Hands in Muddy Water by George Thorogood & The Destroyers
The Meaning of Love by The Beaumonts
Sugar Baby by Legendary Shack Shakers
There to Stay (Small Town Girl)  by The Electric Rag Band
Sam Hall by Tex Ritter
Under the Stone by Jono Manson
Cowboys are Frequently Secretly Fond of Each Other by Willie Nelson

Keg Party at the Muldoon Farm (Ultimate Mix) by Joe West
Cowboy Boots by Dale Watson
Can't Hardly Stand It by Charlie Feathers
She Do the Taboo by Jason Ecklund
San Antonio Romero by Cathy Faber's Swingin' Country Band
Love Bug by Don Rich
Killed a Chicken Last Night by Scott H. Biram
Boogie Woogie Baby of Mine by Bob Burton
Didn't Leave Nobody But the Baby by Emmylou Harris, Allison Krauss & Gillian Welch

Lookout Mountain by Drive-By Truckers
Meet Me in the Alleyway by Steve Earle
When the War Was On by 3 Mississippistaphas 3
Victim of the Tomb by Red Allen
Tramp on the Street by Carl Story
New Lee Highway Blues by David Bromberg
I'll Take the Blame by Ralph Stanley & Rhonda Vincent

I've Been Fooled by Eleni Mandell
Please Don't Tell Me How the Story Ends by Joan Osborne
My Heart Was the Last One to Know by Kris Kristofferson
Gypsy Songman by Jerry Jeff Walker
Jolie Louise by Daniel Lanois
It's All in the Movies by Merle Haggard
Touching Home by Jerry Lee Lewis
CLOSING THEME: Comin' Down by The Meat Puppets

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Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast! CLICK HERE
Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

No Tuneup on the ol' Blog Today

The Terrell's Tuneup I posted in the blog last week got held and didn't appear in Pasatiempo. It's running there this week, so, there's no Tuneup in the blog this week.

Hopefully things will return to "normal" next Friday.

Meanwhile here's some more videos of some of the songs that appeared on mymovie music lists.

Rock on ...

This version of the King Missile classic  has been censored. But you'll probably get the idea.




"Ate a hotdog, it tasted real good / Then I watched a movie from Hollywood ..."



This one's from the heart ...

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017 KSFR, Santa Fe, NM Webcasting! 10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM Ema...