Sunday, March 17, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST






Sunday, March 17, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
The Sky is a Poisonous Garden by Concrete Blonde
That's Tough by Gabriel & The Angels
Bone Machine by The Pixies
Eyes on Me by The Night Beats
Some People by Ar-Kaics
Dancing on My Knees by The Yawpers
Who Do You Love by Patti Smith
Corn Foo Fighting by The Hickoids
All I Know by The Neon Brothers
Don 't Wanna Wash Off Last Night by The Gaunga Dyns

Let's Go Let's Go, Let's Go by Hank Ballard & The Midnighters
You Can't Steal My Shine by The Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band
Hornet by Jon Spencer
Blue Haired Lady by The Polkaholics
Pony Dress by The Flesh Eaters
How It's Done by Unknown Instructors
I'm a No Count by Ty Wagner
Sweet Jane by Lou Reed


THE LAST GASP OF ST. PAT's

Black Velvet Band by The Dubliners
Captain Kelly's Kitchen by Dropkick Murpheys
The Captain's Dead by Paddy & The Rats
The Likes of You Again by Flogging Molly
Donegal Express by Shane McGowan
Some Say the Divil is Dead by The Wolfe Tones
Forty Deuce by Black 47
Molly Malone by Sinead O'Connor



Oklahoma on my Mind by Martha Fields
Don't Let Nobody Drag Yo' Spirit Down by Linda Tillery & The Cultural Heritage Choir with Wilson Pickett & Eric Bibb
Jeep Cherokee Laredo by The War & Treaty
How Many Stars by The Mekons
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

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Thursday, March 14, 2019

TERRELL'S TUNE-UP: Neverland Aftershocks

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
March 15, 2018




I almost feel bad for fans of Michael Jackson following the revelations of Leaving Neverland, the recent HBO documentary detailing the agonizing allegations of sexual abuse, by Jackson, of two of his former kiddie pals, now grown men.

Almost.

Like most living Americans my age, I became aware of Michael Jackson back in my late high school days, when The Jackson 5 began dominating pop charts.

I didn’t like them.

To me they were bubblegum soul, a black version of the Osmonds, who I also couldn’t stand. Both the Osmonds and the Jacksons were out there back then, each doing their best to damage AM radio beyond repair. (Now there’s a good thesis for a Ph.D. in pop culture: How Michael and Donny paved the way for Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity.)

Michael Jackson rarely crossed my mind for years after the demise of The Jackson 5. But around 1979, I started hearing songs from Jackson’s album Off the Wall on the radio — and I thought they didn’t stink too bad for disco-laden pop, going well beyond the pipsqueak pop of his early career.

And soon came Thriller, and with that, Michael Jackson basically became the ’80s in the eyes of his rapidly expanding fan base. As for me, after the initial thrill of Thriller was gone, Jackson once again just seemed cheesy to this old cynic.

At first, it was just that the glitz and excess of both his sound and his image seemed to epitomize everything about the ’80s that I hated.

But it ultimately wasn’t a question of musical taste that bothered me about Jackson and his worldwide legions of true believers. Whispers of pedophilia about Jackson and his seemingly endless parade of boy companions abounded for years.

I myself made a snarky innuendo in this very column back on Jan. 5, 1990. Reviewing a record by Terence Trent D’Arby (Neither Fish Nor Flesh, an album I still love), I wrote, “He can sound as angelic as Michael Jackson crooning lullabies to Webster or as wild as James Brown in a high-speed chase along a southern highway.” (Webster was a 1980s TV sitcom starring child actor Emmanuel Lewis, who was a frequent Jackson boy pal and houseguest in the ’80s.)

In 1993, the parents of one of his constant kiddie companions filed a civil lawsuit against Jackson, alleging he’d molested his son. Jackson settled the case, reportedly for more than $20 million. Jackson loyalists knew that it was just a case of money-grubbing parents trying to besmirch the honor of a wholesome entertainer who just happened to love children.

Yeah, that’s the ticket.

Then in 2003, British journalist Martin Bashir made a documentary called Living with Michael Jackson, in which the singer talked openly about sleeping with the little boys who were guests at his Neverland Ranch.

“It’s not sexual. We’re going to sleep. I tuck them in,” he said. “It’s very charming, it’s very sweet.”

And millions of his fans were charmed. Not so much the district attorney of Santa Barbara. Jackson would be charged with molesting another boy. This case went to trial, but the King of Pop beat the rap — with the help of testimony by Wade Robson, an Australian kid whose family had moved from their home country to California so he could be closer to Jackson, who he’d idolized.

Robson is one of the alleged victims at the center of Leaving Neverland, who in the documentary describes in excruciating detail his story of being raped by Jackson as a young boy.

Some of his fans still — and will always — defend Jackson. But not all. On social media, I’ve seen many Jackson fans who, after seeing the documentary, no longer care to defend him, despite growing up on his music and loving him for most of their lives. While it’s tempting to feel morally superior for never having been a Michael Jackson fan and for pegging him as a child molester years and years ago, I know how it is to have musicians you like transform into monsters.

For instance, I’ve always liked Western-swing pioneer Spade Cooley, even though he murdered his wife. I’ve even made sardonic jokes about that fact when playing Cooley on the radio.

But my perception of Donnell Clyde Cooley changed a couple of years ago when I heard an episode about him on the Cocaine & Rhinestones podcast. Host Tyler Mahan Coe described in brutal detail how Cooley not only killed but tortured Ella Mae Cooley and forced their fourteen-year-old daughter to watch.

“This was not a domestic argument that got out of hand,” Coe said in the podcast. “Not an accident with a dangerous weapon. Not a so-called crime of passion. This wasn’t even an isolated incident. It was a savage and deliberate execution which many people had to have seen coming.”

And while I haven’t thought much of or about the music of Ryan Adams in recent years, during the great alt-country scare in the mid-to-late ’90s, I was a huge fan of his old band Whiskeytown. For years I’ve thought of Adams, who’s always been known for his “bad boy” antics, as a guy who’s just too full of himself.

But a recent article in the New York Times contained serious accusations about his treatment of women, including one allegation that’s caught the interest of the FBI: that he engaged in “graphic texting” and phone sex on Skype with a female musician who was fifteen and sixteen at the time.

How do you separate a horrible man from his art that you love? No easy answer here. Last week comedian Bill Maher said he’ll still go on listening to Thriller — though he might have problems with one of the songs, the one subtitled “Pretty Young Thing.”

So before you start idolizing musicians — or other entertainers or politicians — realize they are not gods but humans. And some humans are just plain evil.

No Michael Jackson videos on this blog.

But here's some TTD:



Wednesday, March 13, 2019

WACKY WEDNESDAY: Happy Birthday Charo!

Charo in 2013
It's a cuchi cuchi Wacky Wednesday!

68 years ago in Murcia Spain -- that's the official story but there is dispute about the year of her birth -- María del Rosario Mercedes Pilar Martínez Molina Baeza was born, But that name was way too long for Las Vegas billboards or Tonight Show credits, so the singer/dancer/comedian/flamenco guitarists became known simply as Charo.

If you watched more than five minutes of television in the '70s you couldn't have missed her. She was a frequent guest on Johnny Carson's show, though she first got national TV exposure on the Ed Sullivan Show in the '60s singing with her then-husband Xavier Cugat's band.

Despite her many talents, Charo in her heyday probably was known best for her sex appeal. She was quoted in Billboard saying, "Around the world I am known as a great musician. But in America I am known as the cuchi-cuchi girl. That’s okay because cuchi-cuchi has taken me all the way to the bank."

Here are some videos of Charo at work. Have a cuchi cuchi birthday, Charo!

Let's start with Charo on a Dean Martin special with Dino and Danny Thomas.



Here's Charo with Cher-o



But yes, she did have real musical talent having reportedly studied flamenco guitar at a school for unprivileged children founded by Andre Segovia. She shows her stuff on this 1977 video:



Cuchi cuchi forever!


via GIPHY

Sunday, March 10, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST




Sunday, March 10, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Jungle Drums by The Dexter Romweber Duo
I Need You by the Rationals
Someone Else is in Control by Mystery Lights
Suburban Junky Lady by Royal Trux
Child of Mercy by The Yawpers
Cinderella by The Flesh Eaters
She Don't by Pussycat & The Dirty Johnsons
Lost in the Dunes by The Vagoos
Rootie Tootie Baby by King Salami & The Cumberland 3
Hobo Bill's Last Ride by Jason Ringenberg
Hey There Stranger by The Compressions

The Hippies Killed the Polka Star by The Polkaholics
Hit It and Quit It by Ty Segall
A Nod by Ty Segall & White Fence
Are You a Boy or Are You a Girl by The Barbarians
Only One by Lonesome Shack
Mirage by The Mekons

Tchoupitoulas Street by The Reverend Horton Heat
Frenchmen Street by The Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band
My Name is Reverend Beat-Man by Reverend Beat-Man & Izobel Garcia
Elvis (We Have to Do That Little Thing) by Dirk Geil
Dream On by Johnny Dowd
Shirts Off by Armitage Shanks
Cold Cabin by The Thick 'Uns
Spin Like a Record by The Scaners

I It Were Me by Homer Henderson
Primitive by The Groupies
Pyscho by The Sonics
From the Estate of John Denver by DBUK
Circumstance by Eleni Mandell
I Ain't Got Nobody by Fats Waller
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

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Thursday, March 07, 2019

TERRELL'S TUNE-UP: 3 Rock 'n' Roll Holy Men


A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
March 8, 2018




I’m not sure how religious you gentle readers are, but I’m going to spotlight the latest albums by three righteous rock ’n’ roll reverends — the Reverend Horton Heat, Reverend Peyton, and Reverend Beat-Man. (Sorry, Reverend Gary Davis, but you’re, uh, dead.) All of these hell-raising holy men preach wild gospels that, to those with ears to hear, can lead to sweet salvation.

Let’s start with Rev. Heat, aka Jim Heath, the longest running member of this trinity, and his new record, Whole New Life. The Dallas native’s debut album, Smoke ’Em If You Got ’Em, was released by Sub Pop Records around the height of that influential label’s heyday, back in 1992.

Heath didn’t invent the term “psychobilly,” which was sometimes used to describe The Cramps in the late ’70s and early ’80s and was picked up by a bunch of British bands like The Meteors and Demented Are Go later in the ’80s.

But the term has been applied to Heath and his band, and they helped popularize it via an instrumental on their first album called “Psychobilly Freakout” — which, judging by the couple of times I’ve seen him perform, remains perhaps his most requested number.

Nobody would call Reverend Horton Heat “psychobilly” anymore. Like most of us who were around in the early ’90s, he’s mellowed and his songs aren’t quite as frenzied as they used to be. But he’s still got a rockabilly heart and the new album has plenty of high-powered rump-shakers. “Perfect” is a perfect example, as is “Got It in My Pocket.” (No, it’s not a rocket, like that old 1958 rockabilly classic by Jimmy Lloyd goes. It’s a diamond ring for a woman to whom he’s going to propose.)

Other standout tracks on Whole New Life include the bluesy “Hog Tyin’ Woman”; the jaunty Professor Longhair/Fats Domino-style New Orleans romp called “Tchoupitoulas Street,” which shows off the talents of the band’s new piano player Matt Jordan; and an uptempo slice of craziness called “Wonky.” (I’m still trying to wrap my mind around a rockabilly song titled “Wonky.”)

Late last year, the prolific Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band (as fans know, a trio from rural Indiana headed by singer/slide guitarist Josh Peyton), released its latest album, Poor Until Payday.

The Big Damn Band — which includes the reverend’s wife, Breezy Peyton, on washboard and background vocals, and drummer Maxwell Senteney — doesn’t break a lot of new musical ground. Basically, if you liked any of their blues-infused, touched-by-gospel albums in the past 15 years or so, or if you’ve enjoyed any of their live shows (they’ve played in Santa Fe and Albuquerque several times in recent years), chances are you’ll like this record.

While Peyton has yet to top his greatest song (“Your Cousin’s on Cops,” from 2008’s The Whole Fam Damnily), there are some fine new tunes in this latest batch. The rousing title song is a soulful rocker about a guy promising to show his woman a good time once his next check comes.

“Get the Family Together” is a rowdy but sweet little tune with some good advice: “Don’t wait for a funeral to get the family together.” And, speaking of funerals, “Church Clothes” is an acoustic song about a guy who needs decent threads because “you know we got the worst kind of call/and I can’t go to town in these dirty overalls.”

And just like Reverend Heat’s latest, Reverend Peyton’s new one has a song about a street in New Orleans. Unlike “Tchoupitoulas Street,” “Frenchmen Street” doesn’t have a lot of Professor Longhair in it. (No piano, for one thing.) And there isn’t a hint of brass either, but every time I hear it, in my mind’s eye I see and hear the impromptu brass band I saw forming one night on Frenchmen Street a few years ago.

And then there’s Reverend Beat-Man, aka Beat Zeller, a Bern, Switzerland, wild man who is more than just a “reverend” when it comes to primitive, trashy rock. He’s the high priest — naw, he’s the dang pope — of “Blues Trash Folk Noir,” the name he gives to the music on Baile Bruja Muerto, his latest album, which is co-credited to Izobel Garcia, a honey-voiced singer (who also plays drums and keyboards) from Los Angeles. Garcia collaborated with Beat-Man on last year’s dandy album, Blues Trash.

Dedicated Beat-Man fans will recognize that the first two songs on this record are ones he’s recorded before. “Pero Te Amo” (But I Love You), sung in Spanish by Garcia, who also performed it on Blues Trash. The Baile Bruja Muerto version is more hard-edged, but Garcia’s voice is equally stunning.

Meanwhile, “Come Back Lord” is a Beat-Man rewrite of an obscure old ’60s garage-rock tune (“Come Back Bird” by an Abilene, Texas, band called Chevelle V), with lyrics about God, sex, and the devil.

At the moment, my favorite tracks are the fuzzed-out rocker “I Never Told You,” sung by Garcia; a cover of a Venom song, “Black Metal,” which has lyrics that seem personally tailored for Beat-Man (“Lay down your soul to the gods of rock ’n’ roll ...”); and Garcia’s take on the Costa Rica-born Chavela Vargas’ “Macorina,” another song she sings in Spanish.

The album ends with a trademark Beat-Man seven-minute spoken-word, sometimes obscene psychosexual religious rant/sermon called "My Name Reverend Beat-Man." Nobody does it like the Rev.

Let's do some videos!

Here's Rev. Heath



Rev. Peyton



And Rev. Beat-Man with Izobel Garcia




THROWBACK THURSDAY: Nobody Cares for Me




Last week I regaled and delighted you readers with a deep dive into the song "Just a Gigolo."

But to fans of Louis Prima & Keely Smith -- and David Lee Roth and The Village People, "Just a Gigolo" is just a half a song -- the other half being "I Ain't Got Nobody."

"I Ain't Got Nobody" was copyrighted in 1915 by lyricist Roger A. Graham and composer Spencer Williams. But authorship is disputed. The late St. Louis pianist Charles Warfield claimed that he'd actually written it with lyrics by Dave Peyton.

Whoever wrote it, the song had legs.

A singer named Marion Harris might have been the first to record it back in 1916,



A decade later Bessie Smith turned it into a blues song.



Louis Armstrong recorded the tune in 1929. (On a later, separate record, he also did a version of "Just a Gigolo.")



Fats Waller picked up the tempo on his mid '30s version. He'd also recorded instrumental versions of the song back in the '20s including one featuring Fats on pipe organ.



In the 40s, Bob Wills swung the song to Texas.



And just a few years ago, Patti Smith sang a retro take, probably closest to the one by fellow Smith Bessie, for the closing credits of HBO's Prohibition-era crime drama Boardwalk Empire.



To conclude, here is Louis Prima's first recording of the "Just a Gigolo/I Ain't Got Nobody" medley in 1945. I still prefer the one we know and love from the '50s, but this is where it started:




In case you mised the link for my look at "Just a Gigolo," CLICK HERE
And for the Stephen W. Web Log Songbook, CLICK HERE

For Wavy Gravy

Sunday, March 03, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST






Sunday, March 3, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Journey to the Center of the Mind by The Amboy Dukes
Cramp Stomp by The Cramps
Cosmonaut by Mean Motor Scooter
Death of a Rockstar by Echocentrics
Good Good Crack by The Fleshtones
Lonely by Lonesome Shack
Surrealistic Feast by Weird Omen
Little Girl by John & Jackie

I'm a Man by Ty Segall
RATFINK by Balzac
Twice Thrice by Alien Space Kitchen
My Life to Live by The Flesheaters
Moon by REQ'D
Hand in Hand by Unknown Instructors
Looking by Archie & The Bunkers

In the Desert by The Mekons
Stuck in a Static in Camber by Mekons 77
It's All About the Money by The Standells
Don't Bother Me by Mark Sultan
Desert Mile by King Khan
Demona by Martha Fields
Many Happy Hangovers to You by Jason Ringenberg
Butterfly by Charlie Gracie

The Man of Your Dreams by Johnny Dowd
Don't Let the Devil Ride by Leo "Bud" Welch
Lass Uns Liebe Machen by Reverend Beat-Man & Izobel Garcia
Thirty-nine and Holding by Jerry Lee Lewis
Nostalgia by Full Speed Veronica
Gotta Lotta Love by The Cactus Blossoms
Just a Gigolo / I Ain't Got Nobody by Louis Prima & Keely Smith with San Butera & The Witnesses
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

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Thursday, February 28, 2019

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Paid for Every Dance


David Bowie in his 1978 film called Just  A Gigolo

A little slice of '80s cheese that was popular on MTV introduced me to a great song.

I'm talking about David Lee Roth's "Just a Gigolo / I Ain't Got Nobody" from his first solo record, the EP Crazy From the Heat."

No, I never was a Van Halen fan, and nothing by Roth, beyond this hit, interested me much.

But what a great performance he gave on this video. I love his hilarious scat singing, I loved his send-up of videos by other stars like Boy George, Michael Jackson, Billy Idol and Willie Nelson (!!). I just loved the song.

It ain't so bad ...

You should too. Check it out:



And I quickly learned that, though it never made MTV, the definitive version of this medley had been done almost three decades before by New Orleans bandleader Louis Prima -- along wikth Keely Smith and Sam Butera & The Witnesses. Prima first recorded the song in 1945, but his 1956 version is the best. This video, from 1959 features that basic arrangement.



But "Just a Gigolo" goes back further, to the 1920s. Originally titled "Schöner Gigolo, armer Gigolo," the song was written in Vienna by composer Leonello Casucci and lyricist Julius Brammer. It dealt with a former military officer who had fallen on hard times after World War I and had to work as a professional escort.

Here's an early recording by Dajos Bela's orchestra featuring vocals by Kurt Mühlhardt.



In 1929 an American songwriter named Irving Caesar (the guy who wrote "Tea for Two"!) adapted the song into English. One of the earliest recordings was by Bing Crosby.




Though the song seems natural for a male singer, some women have recorded it as well. Marlene Dietrich's last movie was Just a Gigolo, starring David Bowie in 1978. She sang the title song.



And somewhere between Louis Prima and David Lee Roth came The Village People.

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Destroy All Robots with the NEW Big Enchilada Podcast

THE BIG ENCHILADA



Robots walk among us! They're here to take our jobs, steal our women, enslave us in robot camps and call us unpleasant names. This episode is a call to action to DESTROY ALL ROBOTS! Except the friendly ones, of course.

And remember, The Big Enchilada is officially listed in the iTunes store. So go subscribe, if you haven't already (and gimme a good rating and review if you're so inclined.) Thanks. 

SUBSCRIBE TO ALL RADIO MUTATION PODCASTS |

Here's the playlist:

(Background Music: Robot by Xancity)
Girl Robot by Horror Deluxe
Who Controls the Weather by Alien Space Kitchen
Galactic Race by The Scaners
Into the Sun by The Mekons
You Lied to Us by Mekons 77
(Somebody Bring Me a Flower) I'm a Robot by The Gourds

(Background Music: Cyborg Control by Man or Astro-Man?)
Giant Robot Rock 'n' Roll by The Goblins
Past the Ditch by Lonesome Shack
Initiation by Unknown Instructors
A Place I Want to Go by Weird Omen
Fool by REQ'D
Funky Robot by Rufus Thomas

(Background Music: Malaga Twist by The Giant Robots)
Dog Eat Robot by The Meteors
SOB by Full Speed Veronica
Sex Android by The Barbarellatones
So Strange Limit by The Reverberations 
You're Out of the Computer by Bingo Gazingo & His Robot Friend
(Background Music: Attack of Robot Atomico by The Ghastly Ones)

Play it HERE:




Sunday, February 24, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, February 24, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist:

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
He Looks Like a Psycho by The Electric Mess
Last Date by David Bromberg
The Loner by Ty Segal
Zig Zag Wanderer by Barrence Whitfield & The Savages
Lawrence of California by The Mekons
What Makes You Think You're the One by Twilight Singers
Turn it On by Lindsey Buckingham

Tusk by Camper Van Beethoven
I'm All In by Alien Space Kitchen
About Alice by The Legendary Tigerman
Lies I Told by Ghost Wolves
I Suffer I Get Tougher by The Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band
Perfect by by The Reverend Horton Heat
Mocorina by by Reverend Beat-Man & Izobel Garcia

OSCARS SET 
Celluloid Heroes by The Kinks
New Age by The Velvet Underground
Beloved Movie Star by Stan Ridgway
It'll Chew You Up and Spit You Out by Concrete Blonde
In Hollywood (Everybody Is a Star) by The Village People
There's No Business Like Show Business by Ethel Merman

Stormy Weather by The Reigning Sound
Love Revolution (Kete Drum Mix) by King Shark
Trash by REQD
Did You Love Me by Shannon & The Clams
Maxine by Martha Fields
Mr. Blue by The Fleetwoods
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

WACKY WEDNESDAY: More Songs for the American Waitress


Back on a bygone Wacky Wednesday -- Oct. 4, 2017 -- I posted a tribute to a lady who's been at the center of many wonderful songs.

I wrote back then;

She's more than just a server of food.

In American song, the waitress is a friend and frequently a fantasy lover of truckdrivers, starry-eyed poets, lonesome drifters and other lost souls on the Lost Highway.

Here are a few more songs for the waitress:

Let's start with Louis Prima and his affections for a waitress named Angelina



Not just a waitress song, this is "The Waitress Song" by Freakwater



Tom T. Hall's favorite waitress was Ravishing Ruby.



In Frank Zappa's 200 Motels, Lonesome Cowboy Burt, portrayed by the late, great Jimmy Carl Black, only wanted to find his waitress ...


I posted Tom Waits' version of "Highway Cafe" back in my last waitress tribute, But the song was written by Kinky Friedman ...





Sunday, February 17, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, February 18, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Eat It by Shonen Knife
Messiah's Lament by Mudhoney
Listen to the Showman Twang by The Dustaphonics
Black Sea by The Vagoos
Bold Marauder by Drywall
My Delight by Detroit Cobras
Dirty Robber by The Wailers
A Place I Want to Know by Weird Omen

Lawrence of California by The Mekons
In the Red by Mekons 77
Me and The Devil by Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band
Fool by REQ'D
SOB by Full Speed Veronica
The Night is Still Young by Jonathan Richman
Timothy by The Buoys
Let's Get The Baby High by The Dead Milkmen

Acquainted WIth The Night by Unknown Instructors
TJ by Hickoids
Sunrise Through the Power Lines by The Reverend Horton Heath
Miss Muerte by The Flesh Eaters
WPLJ by The Mothers of Invention
The Dumb Song by Dale Watson
Catfight by Celine Lee
Out of Control by Alien Space Kitchen

Bar Fight by Hamell on Trial
Let Him Dangle by Elvis Costello
In Heaven (Everything Is Fine) by Laurel Near
Never Argue With a German If You're Tired or European Song by Jefferson Airplane
That Lucky Old Sun by Leon Russell
Always Look on the Bright Side of Life by Monty Python
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Thursday, February 14, 2019

TERRELL'S TUNE-UP: Alien Space Kitchen, Full Speed Veronica and King Shark

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
Feb. 15, 2018



Nothing like some loud and local apocalyptic garage-punk space-pop to get your blood circulating on such a winter’s day. Who’s serving that purpose for me lately? It’s The Golden Age of Climate Change by an Albuquerque band called Alien Space Kitchen.

This seven-song, 26-minute EP is a refreshing blast of raunchy riffs, rump-shaking beats, simple but addictive melodies, and irreverent lyrics about planetary suicide.

Alien Space Kitchen has been around for nearly a decade. They started out as a duo featuring singer Dru Vaughter and drummer/vocalist Noelle Graney. (Originally they called themselves “Dr. Rox” and “Chiffon,” respectively, but those monikers didn’t last.) Their first album, Just ASK, was released in 2012. Sometime before 2016’s Some of This Is True, they picked up a permanent bass player, Terry “Mess” Messal, who helped solidify the Space Kitchen’s sound.

At the moment, my favorite track on this record is “In the Mud,” in which Vaughter sings matter-of-factly, “Back in swamp, deep in the water/Weather’s getting warmer, world is getting hotter.” Though other tunes here have similar messages — how to cope when the world is headed for a boiling point — Vaughter never seems preachy. It’s like he’s conjuring troubling images with a smile on his face, while his guitar screams in rage.

Another worthy one is “Who Controls the Weather,” which unabashedly veers down the conspiracy rabbit hole. Of course, they’re being tongue-in-cheek here … I think … (Remember, this is the same band that did a song called “How to Fake a Lunar Landing” on Some of This Is True.) The song ends with Vaughter and Graney singing, repeatedly, “The world is run on gasoline/I’m gonna destroy your weather machine ...”

Also impressive is “Down in Flames,” a crunching — and rather paranoid — rocker with the grim refrain, “It’s all going down in flames/It’s never going to be the same/God damn, ain’t that a shame?” Though the lyrics are dire, there’s a strong glimmer of hope just in the way Vaughter and Graney sing it. Maybe I’m nuts, but I think I detect a knowing wink in the delivery.

Like most good EPs, The Golden Age of Climate Change leaves a listener wanting just a little more. The good news is that more might be just around the corner. This record has a subtitle: The ASK EP Project – Volume 1. “This series of themed EPs will cover a broad range of topics and styles,” the website says. “ASK’s current mission is to release a new volume with a new theme and new songs approximately every 3 months.”

Here’s hoping the Space Kitchen crew follow through on that.

Some other recent New Mexico records:

* June 31 by Full Speed Veronica. It’s another rocking little trio that hails from this Enchanted Land. Guitarist Malcolm June and drummer Matt Worley started the band as a quartet with bassist Nathan Hey and someone named Brandon back in 2008. Hey left the group in 2016 and was replaced by Sarah Meadows. Like June, she’s an alumna of early 21st-century New Mexico rockers The Hollis Wake (and a former arts editor of the Santa Fe Reporter).

Though definitely guitar-centric, Full Speed Veronica is less punky than, say, Alien Space Kitchen. Their melodic sound actually is closer to folk-rock, though they don’t sound much like The Byrds. Fortunately, they also don’t sound much like Three Dog Night or Billy Joel, both of whom are included in Veronica’s lengthy list of influences on their Facebook page. (But I would kind of like to hear them do a version of “Mama Told Me Not to Come.”)

Among the standouts on June 31 are the opening song, “Barnburner,” which has hints of Byrdsy jangle and Dinosaur Jr. roar; the slow, minor-key “A Month of Sundays,” which starts out with June on acoustic guitar; and the soulful “The Great Escape,” which features Meadows on vocals.

Check out Full Speed Veronica's Bandcamp page. You’ll find June 31 there as well as their previous two albums — Always Play the Part and Been Known to Lie, which are available for “name your own price.”


* Walk in the Light and Dub to the Ite’s by King Shark. Alphanso Henclewood, the man behind the Shark, has lived in these parts for most of the last couple of decades, but he was born in Jamaica, the Greenwich Farm district of Kingston, to be exact. And it’s there where Henclewood returns every so often to record himself and his friends playing old-school reggae.

According to a story in the Jamaica Observer last March, King Shark was there for “his most ambitious recording sessions to date” for which he “assembled a crack team of musicians to cut tracks for an album he hopes to release this year.”

The story mentioned two songs — “Walk in the Light” and “Love Revolution,” which he recorded at the famous Tuff Gong studio. That “crack team” included guitarist Earl “Chinna” Smith, who has played with too many major reggae musicians to list here, and who is a boyhood friend of Shark’s.

Walk in the Light consists of several versions and mixes of the two songs mentioned in the Observer. So a listener gets to know both songs inside out. My favorite tracks are the “Straight Mix” of the title song and the stripped-down Kete Drums mix of “Love Revolution.”

The other new album under the King Shark banner, Dub to the Ite’s, features ten instrumentals with Smith and other stalwarts of the Shark’s impressive stable.

But wait, there’s more.

Shark also has a new various-artist compilation, Kingston 13,  which he produced, including singers like Pretty Rebel, U Mike, Peter Rankin, and Candyman. My favorite tunes here, though — “Got Feelings 4u” and “I Like to Know” — are love songs performed by a sweet-voiced female duo, Amanda & Queen Lydia Garcia.

King Shark’s albums can be found at CD Baby, The Kingston 13 compilation also is CD Baby.

Here are some videos

Unfortunately I couldn't find any of Alien Space Kitchen's new songs. But here is one called "Alien Agenda" from their previous album:



Here's Full Speed Veronica doing "Barnburner" on the Santa Fe Plaza last May


All hail King Shark!



THROWBACK THURSDAY: Rollin' 'round Heaven


Sorry, I couldn't find the version "Lucky Old Sun" by this Japanese surf band. 

When I was just a kid, while listening to the radio one night, way past my bedtime, I heard a song that shook me because it was just so sad -- the saddest song I'd ever heard up to then.

It was Ray Charles' 1960s version of a song that had been covered by many major singers for more than a decade before. "That Lucky Old Sun." It was from his 1963 album Ingredients in a Recipe for Soul.

Remember, I was just a kid, and wasn't familiar with previous versions by several major artists. Brother Ray made a huge impression that's lasted nearly 60 years. I could feel depths of sorrow and frustration as Charles sang, "I fuss with my woman, toil with my kids/Sweat 'til I'm wrinkled and gray/I know that lucky old sun has nothin' to do/But roll around heaven all day."

Note: In other versions I've heard, the lyrics are "... fuss with my woman toil for my kids ..." But by singing "toil with my kids" made it sound like the singer was so depressed that even playing with his kids was a burden. That's just one of the things that hit me when I first heard Ray sing it.

But man other artists have recorded the song, which was written by   Beasley Smith (who with Owen Bradley co-wrote the Roy Acuff hit "Night Train to Memphis") with lyrics by Haven Gillespie -- who co-wrote "Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town."

"That Lucky Old Sun" first hit the world in 1949 with versions by  by Frankie Lane,  Frank Sinatra, Vaughn Monroe and Louis Armstrong. Since then it's also been recorded by the likes of Aretha Franklin, Sam Cooke, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Sam & Dave, Dean Martin, Sarah Vaughan and countless others.

Here are some other covers.

The Killer downright killed it



Here's Big Mama Thornton



The Velvets did a pop doo-wop version



The Lucky Old Sons of the Pioneers took it to the campfire



Brian Wilson in 2008 created a song cycle around the song.



Leon Russell recorded this on the last album he released during his life, 2014's Life Journey.



Still, none of these match the power and glory of the Ray Charles version that first shook me as a child.









Sunday, February 10, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, February 10, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Don't Try It by The Devil Dogs
One the One by Lonesome Shack
Love Handle by Jon Spencer
Cut Me Down by The Ar-Kaics
Last Peace by The Oh Sees
Pero te Amo (But I Love You) by Reverend Beat-Man with Izobel Garcia
Don't Run, We're Your Friends by The Scaners
Barrelhouse Queen by J.D. Hangover
Greasy Moves by Oh! Gunquit

Into the Sun / The Galaxy Explodes by The Mekons
Healy Wavin' by Mekons 77
The Great Escape by Full Speed Veronica
Who Controls the Weather by Alien Space Kitchen
Sharkey's Night by Laurie Anderson
All Men Are Liars by Nick Lowe

Love for Higher by Dirty Fences
Rhesus Christ by The Fezz
Old n Cold by A Pony Named Olga
Hide & Seek by St. Louis & The Walking Dead
Walk in the Light (Straight Mix) by King Shark
Beer, Broads and Brats by The Polkaholics
Punk Rock Girl by Philly Boy Roy

It's All Right / Sentimental Reasons by Sam Cooke
All I Wanna Do by The War & Treaty
Last Train to Sanesville by Martha Fields
Deerslayer by DBUK
Sand by OP8
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Wednesday, February 06, 2019

WACKY WEDNESDAY: The Shaving Cream Variations



Last week in Terrell's Tune-Up I reviewed the new punk-rock tribute to Dr. Demento, which contains not one, but versions of the Demento classic "Shaving Cream" by the late, great Benny Bell. East Coast kiddy-show host Uncle Floyd Vivino does both versions -- one with "punk rock lyrics," the other with original lyrics.

In case you are not aware of this masterpiece, here's the 1946 original:


But Bell and Uncle Floyd aren't the only ones to ever sing "Shaving Cream." And I'm not talking about Phil Winston aka Paul Wynn, who actually supplied the vocals on Bell's original. This song's been around the world.

It popped up in The Netherlands in 1969 by a band called The Cats.



The song gained a following in Jamaica, where in the '70s it was recorded by a group called The Fabulous Five. Then, in the late '80s, a band called The Jollys put the mento in Demento with this version.



American folk monster Dave Van Ronk did a funny take on this funny song. (You gotta listen til the very end)



Taking Van Ronk's interpretation a few levels beyond, a few years ago The Melvin grabbed the shaving cream and blew it to Smithereens.

Sunday, February 03, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, February 3, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Fishheads by Osaka Popstar
Do Yourself In by Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears
Louie Louie by Iggy Pop
Haunted by The Sloths
Down i Flames by Alien Space Kitchen
Snake Drive by R.L. Burnside & The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion
Ain't Gonna Take No Mess by Cedric Burnside
Past the Ditch by Lonesome Shack
Telephone Man by Quintron & Miss Pussycat

10 Years Gone: R.I.P. Lux

Bend Over, I'll Drive by The Cramps
Garbage Man by William Shatner
Bikini Girls With Machine Guns by The Cramps

The Wedding Dice by The Flesh Eaters
The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle by Lolita No. 18
Biff Bang Pow by Jake Starr & The Delicious Fullness
The Swamp by Slocks


Buddy, Bopper and Ritchie: 60 Years Gone 


(Winter Dance Party Commercial)
Reminiscing by Buddy Holly
Monkey Song (You Made a Monkey Out of Me) by The Big Bopper
We Belong Together by Ritchie Valens
Chantilly Lace by Jerry Lee Lewis
Changing All Those Changes by Buddy Holly
Framed by Los Lobos
La Bamba by Freddy Fender
Framed by Los Lobos
Hi-Tone by Ritchie Valens
True Love Ways by The Mavericks
White Lightning by The Waco Brothers
Peggy Sue by Lou Reed
Peggy Sue Got Married by Buddy Holly
Big Bopper's Wedding by The Big Bopper
Words of Love by The Beatles
Midnight Shift by Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen
Oooh! My Head by Ritchie Valens
Crazy Blues by The Big Bopper
Learning the Game by Waylon Jennings & Mark Knopfler
La Bamba by The Plugz
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Thursday, January 31, 2019

TERRELL'S TUNE-UP: Dr. Demento's Punk Progeny

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
Feb. 1, 2018



I’m a longtime fan of Barret Hansen, aka Dr. Demento, even though I never figured out what the difference between a “dementoid” and a “dementite” is, or which one applies to me.

So it’s probably not a huge surprise to learn that I’m also a fan of Dr. Demento Covered in Punk, a new tribute album featuring many of the oddball ditties as well as many of the artists who graced — or disgraced — his wacky weekly radio show.

Hansen is not a practicing physician. And he’s not a Ph.D., though he does have a master’s degree in ethnomusicology from the University of California, Los Angeles. He’s written serious pieces about music for serious publications, including Downbeat and Rolling Stone — and no, not about the history of fart jokes in 20th-century song. Despite his goofball persona, the guy knows his stuff when it comes to music.

According to song and legend, Dr. Demento earned his nickname back in the early ’70s when another DJ called him “demented” for playing the black-humor rockabilly classic “Transfusion” by Nervous Norvus on his show.

Embracing his inner weirdness — and frequently his inner corniness — the young doctor created a unique format that included novelty records old and new, song parodies, spoken-word comedy, outsider music, and, by the mid-’70s, a good smattering of punk rock.

On an October 1976 show that also included tracks by Spike Jones, Bobby “Boris” Pickett (but not The Monster Mash), The Mothers of Invention, Fats Waller, and Captain Beefheart, Demento played “Beat on the Brat” by The Ramones for the first time. He soon began playing the likes of The Sex Pistols, Devo, The Misfits, The Cramps, The Dead Kennedys, The Dead Milkmen, and others.

Demento’s syndicated show was one of the few national broadcast outlets that would play anything by many of these acts, one of the few safe harbors for punks in the putrid sea of commercial radio.

“It’s often been said that punk rock began as a reaction to the bloated corporate rock scene that had taken hold in the 1970s,” Hansen says between songs on Covered in Punk. “And you could say the same about the Dr. Demento Show as well. The Ramones wanted to bring back the youthful spirit of fun that had gone missing from the airwaves. And so did I.”

Covered in Punk is like an extended Dr. Demento radio show, with versions of his familiar opening and closing themes, celebrity promos — “Hi, I’m Tom Lehrer and you’re lucky enough to be listening to The Dr. Demento Show” — and Demento himself doing intros and outros after every couple of songs or so.

Some of the best songs here include “Surfin’ Bird,” covered by that “wascally wabbit” Nobunny (who also does a decent cover of “Monster,” originally performed by B-52s strongman Fred Schneider); Roky Erickson’s “Creature With the Atom Brain,” sung here by Quintron & Miss Pussycat; Balzac, a Japanese band, covering “Rat Fink,” an Allan Sherman tune; Los Straitjackets covering the definitive Alfred E. Newman instrumental “It’s a Gas” (which originally was available on a flexi-disc insert in an issue of Mad magazine); and The Meatmen doing Frank Zappa’s “My Guitar Wants to Kill Your Mama.”

I am not a huge fan of Weird Al Yankovic, the song parodist who is Dr. Demento’s most famous discovery. But I have to admit that I totally love his faithful, joyful cover of The Ramones’ “Beat on the Brat.” I’m glad he didn’t turn the song into some crappy parody. Eat on the Bratwurst? Build a Wall with Slats?

And three songs that I consider the holy trinity of Dementoland are represented here. The Bizarro World anthem “Fish Heads” — originally by a group called Barnes and Barnes (Billy Mumy, who played Will Robinson in TV’s Lost in Space was one of the Barneses, but I’m not sure which) — gets punked up by the band Osaka Popstar. (Guitarist John Cafiero also produced this tribute album.) The comically overwrought “Dead Puppies” also gets a punk-rock makeover by James Kochalka Superstar, a band led by comic-book artist Kochalka.

And “Shaving Cream,” Borscht-belter Benny Bell’s 1946 masterpiece, gets not one but two versions on this collection, both by East Coast kiddy-show host Uncle Floyd Vivino. The first has updated, punk-related lyrics (the singer steps in a pile of ... shaving cream in a mosh pit, etc.) while the reprise has the original Bell lyrics. Both are done as a thunderous waltz, featuring Vivino’s straight-outta-Shakey’s Pizza rinky-tinky piano.

But the greatest track on Covered in Punk is “Garbage Man,” sung by the grand master of the Golden Throats, Captain Kirk himself, William Shatner. Shatner bellows, growls, and over-emotes the lyrics over a fuzzy Peter Gunn guitar. “Do you understand? I’m the garbage man!!” It’s true that Shatner’s “musical career” was funnier back when he didn’t understand that people were laughing at his versions of “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” and “Mr. Tambourine Man.” But even though he’s in on the joke these days, he’s still Shatner. It’s so crazy, it’s magical.

It would be a huge exaggeration to call Dr. Demento a major figure in the punk-rock history. But show me a punk rocker who doesn’t like “Shaving Cream” or “Fish Heads” or “Dead Puppies,” and I’ll show you a humorless stiff who shouldn’t be allowed around other people.

Here are a buncha the songs from Covered in Punk

Here's Roky Erickson's "Creature With the Atom Brain."



There's a monster in Nobunny's rabbit mask



Weird Al does The Ramones



In the port of Amsterdam, where the sailors all meet, there's a sailor who eats only fish heads and tails ...



But there is not, nor will there ever be a singer as spectacular as Shatner!



THROWBACK THURSDAY: Happy Birthday Alan Lomax!

Alan Lomax in 1948

Once again, it's the birthday of Alan Lomax, the great ethnomusicologist  whose field recordings, especially those he did in the American South, helped change our understanding of American music. He was born on this day in Austin, Texas in 1915.

A couple of years ago, I wrote this:

Lomax, following in the footsteps of his father, John Lomax, was a musicologist who, beginning in the 1930s, traveled through the South -- to plantations, prisons, backwood churches, Louisana fai do-dos -- recording thousands of wild, raw songs and stories of the people that you didn't hear on the radio. John and Alan Lomax helped establish the Library of Congress’ Archive of American Folk Song.

Through the years Alan Lomax would cross paths with some of the most revered names in folk, blues, jazz and hillbilly music. He recorded McKinley Morganfield -- later to become known as Muddy Waters -- recording him playing acoustic blues while he was still living on Stovall Plantation near Clarksdale, Mississippi. He was the first to record Leadbelly and Woody Guthrie. He also did sessions with Jelly Roll Morton, Reverend Gary Davis,  Big Bill Broonzy and Missisippi Fred McDowell.

So here's another smattering of Lomax recordings that help remind us of the richness of American folk music -- as performed by the folks.

Here's some Dock Boggs, recorded in 1966



Here's Jelly Roll Morton discussing and demonstrating the music of Mardi Gras Indians in 1938.



A gospel tune from Mississippi Fred McDowell



A man called Muddy ...



And here's some Cajun fiddling from the great Dennis McGee with Sady Courville

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Climb Up on This Podcast!

THE BIG ENCHILADA



I may be going out on a limb here, but I do believe this spruced-up weirdness could turn out to be one of my most poplar Big Enchilada episodes ever. We'll get down to the roots of rock 'n' roll with a little rockabilly from Andy Anderson (a former New Mexico resident!) and branch out into some crazy garage-rock sounds and a few nutty novelty tunes. So no more acorny jokes, let's get on with the music!

And remember, The Big Enchilada is officially listed in the iTunes store. So go subscribe, if you haven't already (and gimme a good rating and review if you're so inclined.) Thanks. 

SUBSCRIBE TO ALL RADIO MUTATION PODCASTS |

Here's the playlist:

(Background Music: Chestnut Trees and Bumble Bees by Satan's Pilgrims)
Tall Oak Tree by Andy Anderson
The Other Side of This Life by The Mal Thursday Quintet
Cinderella by The Flesh Eaters
Blood on the Track by St. Louis & The Walking Dead
No Count (Lost Sounds) by Space Trees
Shaving Cream by Uncle Floyd Vivino & Oogie
Everybody Wants My Fanny by Benny Bell

(Background Music: I Ate Up the Apple Tree by Kermit Ruffins
Palm Trees, Sun and Parking Lots by The Terrorists
Black Metal by Reverend Beat-Man & Nicole Izobel Garcia
Gangsters by The Dustaphonics
No Sex by Alex Chilton
Garbage Man by William Shatner

(Background Music: A Broken Road Lined with Poplar Trees by A Hawk & A Hacksaw)
Cutting Trees by Left Lane Cruiser
Tough Guy by Phil Hayes & The Trees
Spike Heels by Wayne Kramer
Ain't Worth the Time by Thee Dagger Debs
Good and Well by Fezz
(Background Music: Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree by ProSound Karaoke Band)


Play it HERE:


Sunday, January 27, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, January 27, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Diddy Wah Diddy by Ty Segal Band
Monster by Nobunny
She's Obsessed With Herself by The Ar-Kaics
Valium Queen by The Vagoos
I'll Take Care of You by Reverend Beat-Man & Izobel Garcia
Angel Baby by Rosie & The Originals
House Amid the Thickets by The Flesh Eaters
Don't Freak Me Out by The Darts
Acid Books by The Callas with Lee Ranaldo

Ride That Train by The Oblivians
Archive from 1959 by The Buff Medways
Don't Want You Either by The Mal Thursday Quintet
Garbagehead by Eric Ambel
Baby Please Don't Go by Them
We're All Water by Yoko Ono & Elephant's Memory

Duck for the Oyster by Malcolm McLaren
Touch and Go by The Fleshtones
Night and Fog by Mudhoney
My Guitar Wants to Kill Your Mama by The Meatmen
Orange County Lumber Truck by Frank Zappa
Thomas Dorsey by Johnny Dowd
Hillbilly Bop by Martha Fields
Der Stampfer by Dirk Geil
What Makes You Think You're the One by Twilight Singers

Keep Movin' by Freddie Cannon & The Gears
Dirty Water Land by Salty Pajamas
Headstrong by Phil Hayes & The Trees
The Man from Another Time by Seasick Steve
Deerslayer by DBUK
(Out on the Street) Junk is Still King by Gary Heffern
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

Sunday, March 17, 2019 KSFR, Santa Fe, NM Webcasting! 10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM E...