Wednesday, May 22, 2019

WACKY WEDNESDAY: A Little Shot of Bollywood


It's been several years since I did a Bollywood post on Wacky Wednesday, so why the heck not.

As I said before, I don't speak Hindi and I've never seen the movies these clips come from so I won't pretend to know what's going on in any of them.

But trust me, you won't need to know what's going on in these videos. Just sit back and enjoy the work of people having a lot more fun that you!

This one's from  Meri Jung (1985) starring Anil Kapoor, Meenakshi Seshadhri, Nutan, Javed Jaffrey, Amrish Puri.Besides the wonderful dancing, it ends with a cool sax solo from a guy in a cowboy hat. So welcome friends, to the show that never ends.



These next two my friend Sean alerted me to. He described this one as "Every 80's video cliche rolled into one song."



And this one's short but twisted:


And for those who don't want to see or hear Michael Jackson anymore but still like the song "Thriller" ...



For more crazy Bollywood songs, check out this Wacky Wednesday from 2015



Sunday, May 19, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST




Sunday, May 19, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
What a Wonderful World by Joey Ramone
Jolie's Nightmare by Chuck E. Weiss
Black Magic by Mark Sultan
Goin' Down by The Mystery Lights
Glad Rag Ball by Daddy Long Legs
Buy a Gun Get a Free Guitar by Deadbolt
Oh My Darling Clementine by Johnny Dowd
Gallows Pole by Neil Young & Crazy Horse
Run to Jesus for Refuge by Charles Barnett

Dancing with Mr. D by The Rolling Stones
The Bear by Johnny "Guitar" Watson
She's a Rainbow by The Barbarellatones
Don't Leave Me Alone by The Jackets
The Art of Projection by ImperialWax
Sir William Wray by The Fall
Haunt by REQ'D
The Polka Inquisition by The Polkaholics

Dancing on My Knees by The Yawpers
Legs by PJ Harvey
I'm Hurtin; by Cedric Burnside
We Spartan Dreggs  (Be Fine) by The Spartan Dreggs
Bong Song by Butthole Surfers
Smooth Commander by Left Lane Cruiser
Hey Gyp by The Orphans
Insect Collector by Shonen Knife
Spider by They Might Be Giants

Isolation by Ty Segall
Low by Nots
Biological Speculation by Funkadelic
Weimer Vending Machine / Priest by The Mekons
Tower of Song by Tom Jones
Hell Yeah by Neil Diamond
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Thursday, May 16, 2019

THROWBACK THURSDAY: And Her Shoes Were Number 9


Here's a song I first heard by the Original Blue Dog Democrat:



To this day, I can't hear the song "Oh My Darling Clementine" without thinking of ol' Huck.

The lyric of the song are credited to Percy Montrose, who wrote it and published it in 1884. The melody is similar, if not identical, to an earlier song called "Down the River Liv'd a Maiden," published in 1863, by one Henry S. Thompson.

In the liner notes of his five-volume series American Favorite Ballads (recorded 1957-1962), Pete Seeger wrote "The tune is probably much older. Sounds German to me, but I've been told it was Mexican, early 19th Century."

Who knows? But even by the late 19th Century, people were already messing with poor Clementine. Writer Shaleane Gee, in the excellent blog Murder Ballad Monday says, "In versions of the song credited to Barker Bradford circa 1885, the miners ... make it clear that she gave them a good time. ...
In some versions, the lyrics suggest Clementine was charging the miners fees for her favors, sometimes with the approval or even at the prodding of her poppa."

Sample lyrics from the Bradford version:

Her noble father was the foreman
Of every valued mine,
And ever miner and every ranchman
Was known to Clementine.

But as Gee observes, most modern versions of the song have "scrubbed" such lyrics.

According to some sources, including Seeger's liner notes,  the first recording of "Clementine" was in 1928 by a group called Floyd Thompson and His Hometowners, then six years later by Kentucky country singer Bradley Kincaid.

But I couldn't find either on YouTube or in the Internet Archives. The earliest one I did find was by a singer named John McCready was recorded by ethnomusicologist, Sidney Robertson Cowell at the Arizona Bar in Groveland, Calif. on August 2, 1939  for the W.P.A. California Folk Music Project collection.



Der Bingle did a slightly smoother version just two years later.



In 1946 the song was turned into a movie by director John Ford. It starred Henry Fonda and Linda Darnell as Clementine.



Tom Lehrer had some fun with the song he said had "no recognizable merit whatsoever."



In the early '60s Bobby Darin turned the song into an exercise in fat-shaming. How fat was she? She broke the damned bridge, hardy har har. Then in a moment of raw compassion, Bobby sings, "Hey, I'm no swimmer, but were she slimmer / I might have saved fat Clementine"

What a card ...



Neil Young & Crazy Horse did a mighty version on their album Americana, taking Clementime to new levels of bitchenicity.



And more recently, Johnny Dowd took the song to Mars on his 2018 album Twinkle Twinkle. I think I hear more than a little bit of Huckleberry Hound in this one.

Sunday, May 12, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST




Sunday, May 12, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Wish That She'd Come Back by The Mystery Lights
Cut Me Down by The Ar-Kaics
Mornin', Noon & Night by Daddy Long Legs
Disconnected by The Electric Mess
Freedom by Ty Segall
Evil Hearted You by The Yardbirds
Boom Boom by The Barons
Hurt Me by Thee Headcoatees
21 Marzo by The Pussywarmers


Turncoat by Imperial Wax
Brillo de Facto by The Fall
Blood by REQ'D
Healing Tide by The War & Treaty
Smoke Keep Rising by Left Lane Cruiser
Only One by Lonesome Shack
Pyschonaut by ET Explore Me
Move On by The Jackets

Dirty Mother For You (Don't You Know) by Roosevelt Sykes & Henry Townsend
The Blues Come Falling Me by Johnny Shines
Can't You See by Henry Townsend (with Vernell Townsend)
I Want to Die Easy by Leo "Bud" Welch
The Old Ball Game by The Mighty Hannibal
I Have A Mother (Don't Need Another by The Polkaholics

Vault by Sleeve Cannon
That Shelf by Johnny Mafia
Harrar 1883 by The Mekons
New Blue Mercedes by Drywall
My Eyes by Tony Gilkyson
Is That You in the Blue by Dex Romweber Duo
The Comedians by Roy Orbison
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

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Friday, May 10, 2019

TERRELL'S TUNE-UP: New Blues Releases


A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
May 10, 2018


In the few short years it’s been around, Omnivore Recordings (founded in 2010) has become a major reissue/rarities label. Its catalogue includes old, out-of-print albums (and in some cases, new compilations) by some of the true greats in rock, jazz, and country. And don’t forget the blues. In recent months, Omnivore has released several worthy records by venerated bluesmen of yore. Here are some of them — and another one not from Omnivore but worth mentioning.

* Blues Piano and Guitar (Live) by Henry Townsend and Roosevelt Sykes. One of the biggest
compliments you can give to any live album is stating, upon listening to it, “I wish I could have been there.” Despite its lackluster title, that’s definitely the case with this 2-CD team-up of Townsend, who supplies the guitar, and Sykes, a renowned blues pianist as well as singer, known as the “Louisiana Honey Dripper.”

Recorded at a February 1973 show at Washington University’s Graham Chapel in Townsend’s adopted hometown of St. Louis (where Sykes lived for most of his early years), this was a reunion show for a couple of old friends — both well into their 60s at that point. They’d first met in the 1920s. Townsend sought out the older, more famous piano man in hopes of learning how to play the instrument. In that process, Townsend taught Sykes some basic guitar. They gigged together, and by the early ’30s, had recorded together.

Armed only with his guitar and voice, Townsend kicks off the show with a song called “Sloppy Drunk Again.” He goes on this way for several songs until he calls his wife, Vernell, onto the stage for a duet on a sweet bluesy “Why We Love Each Other So.” She returns later in the show to sing a tune called “Tears Come Rollin’ Down.”

After that, Sykes comes out for a long solo set, and from this point on he basically dominates the rest of the show. The bulk of his numbers here are nice and filthy, the funniest being “Dirty Mother for You (Don’t You Know).” Here the bawdy old bluesman suggests he’s about to use a dirty word but unexpectedly makes a sharp turn toward the wickedly innocuous.

Townsend and Sykes don’t actually perform any songs together except a couple at the beginning of the second disc. I would have loved to hear more cuts featuring both. Still, I wish I could have been there that night in 1973.

* Mule (Expanded Edition) by Henry Townsend. Originally released in 1980 by the Nighthawk
label, this recording shows Townsend still in fine form. Here he plays piano as well as guitar. This version has the entire original album plus eight previously unissued songs.

On several songs, he’s joined by the great country-blues picker who also started off in the 1920s, Tennessee-born mandolin player James “Yank” Rachell. There’s something about Yank’s mandolin that just makes a song seem spookier. This is especially apparent on “Things Have Changed.” Yank makes the song sound like it’s live from a haunted juke joint.

Vernell Townsend helps her husband sing on another favorite on this album, the ragged but righteous love song “Can’t You See.” She also does a studio version of “Tears Come Rollin’ Down” on Mule, which I like even better than the live version.

* The Blues Came Falling Down by Johnny Shines. Born in 1915, Shines was a contemporary of Robert Johnson, who he met in the 1930s. The two traveled and played together for a couple of years before Johnson died in 1938. Though long dead, Johnson’s ghost was well represented on this live album, which, like the Townsend/Sykes show, was recorded in 1973 at Graham Chapel. Four songs here are Johnson’s: “Kind Hearted Woman Blues,” “I’m a Steady Rollin’ Man,” the ubiquitous “Sweet Home Chicago” (honestly, I wouldn’t shed too many tears if there were federal legislation enacted that prohibited future covers of this overdone song), and “They’re Red Hot (Hot Tamales),” which is my favorite of these covers, not only because it’s one of Johnson’s least-covered songs, but also because of Shines’ semi-comical 90-mph vocal delivery on it.

This album is almost entirely Shines accompanied by himself on guitar, though Nighthawk Records honcho Leroy Jodie Pierson plays guitar on three songs. The strongest tunes are a potential stoner anthem, “Stay High All Day Long,” and a Blind Willie Johnson spiritual, which Shines said was a favorite of his mother’s, “It’s Nobody’s Fault But Mine.”

* The Angels in Heaven Done Signed My Name by Leo “Bud” Welch. No, this one didn’t come
from Omnivore. (It’s on a label called Easy Eye Sound.) And technically this isn’t a blues album, but a posthumous collection of gospel tunes from a Mississippi native known just as much, if not more, for his religious material as his blues. But who cares? This goes well with the albums reviewed above.

Welch didn’t release his first record until 2014, when he was in his 80s. His late-blossoming music career was cut short when he died in 2017 at 83. That was shortly after he recorded with Dan Auerbach, formerly of The Black Keys, now a hotshot Nashville producer. The Black Keys started out in the 1990s as a teenage duo that worshipped Fat Possum blues codgers like T-Model Ford.

As a producer, Auerbach mostly was respectful to Welch’s material, though he wasn’t afraid to juice it up to create a gospel-with-a-punch aura. It works best on rousing cuts like “I Come to Praise His Name” and “Don’t Let the Devil Ride.” However, Auerbach’s loud production basically overwhelms “Jesus on the Mainline,” making me long for Ry Cooder’s version of 40-some years ago.

Let there be videos:









Thursday, May 09, 2019

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Happy Birthday, Sonny Curtis

Buddy Holly with Sonny Curtis in the mid 1950s

Happy birthday to one of the finest songwriters ever to emerge from Lubbock, Texas, He's 82 years old today.

Happy birthday. Sonny!

From the bio on his website:

Sonny was born in a dugout about seven miles east of Meadow, Texas in 1937. He was the second youngest of six children born to struggling cotton farmers during the devastating Dust Bowl era.

In the Curtis family, music was a way of life. And in Meadow, it was the main source of entertainment. When he was a boy, Sonny and his family would gather with neighbors for "musical Saturday nights," where anyone who played an instrument could join in the fun. 

Sonny learned to play before his fingers could reach across the neck of the guitar; he just played on the four high strings. He joined his older brothers, Pete and Dean, to pick at local radio stations, jamborees, and other events.

When he reached his teens, Sonny"s friends and contemporaries were fellow musicians Buddy Holly, Waylon Jennings, and future Crickets (J. I. Allison, Joe B. Mauldin, and Glen D. Hardin.) While he was still in high school, Dave Stone, a local promoter, frequently used him on bills that included the young Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Hank Snow, and other stars of the day. 

Before Buddy Holly started The Crickets, his band was The Three Tunes, in which Sonny played lead guitar. In 1956, Sonny accompanied Holly and bassist Don Guess to Nashville for Holly's first recording sessions. (Petty Studios in Clovis, N.M. came later.) Sonny played lead guitar on several tunes including  "Blue Days, Black Nights," "Midnight Shift," and the first song Sonny wrote to ever be recorded, "Rock Around With Ollie Vee."

It indeed was a rocker:



Another early Sonny original was recorded by country star Webb Pierce. This almost sounds like hillbilly doo-wop.



Sonny had joined The Crickets shortly before Buddy died, The Crickets tried to go on with Sonny as singer. During that time, Sonny wrote this little outlaw tune which later would be a major hit for The Bobby Fuller Four (and years later, The Clash).



The post-Holly Crickets' time was cut short when Sonny got drafted. While serving in the Army he wrote this song which turned out to be a huge hit for The Everly Brothers. The version below features Sonny playing with fellow Texan Nanci Griffith.


In the early days of Beatlemania, old Cricket Sonny declared he wanted to be a Beatle in this forgotten novelty tune. (The irony here is that The Beatles have always said their name was inspired by The Crickets.)



And in the early '70s Sonny wrote and sang the theme song a popular TV sitcom. (But I like Husker Du's version the best)




Sunday, May 05, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST




Sunday, May 5, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Fiesta by The Pogues
Gutterboy Blues by Mean Motor Scooter
Traces by The Mystery Lights
Hanging Tree by Bob Mould
Pictures of Lily by Hickoids
Queen of the Pill by The Jackets
Dad or Dead by Dirk Geil
Contageous by Sleeve Cannon

The Art of Projection by Imperial Wax
I've Been Duped by The Fall
Mechanic Wanted by Mekons 77
St. Stephen by Ty Segall
Sucka Punch  (Get Back) by Dinola
Two Dollar Elvis by Left Lane Cruiser
When Fate Deals Its Mortal Blow by Meet Your Death
The Dozens by Eddie "One String" Jones
Hokomo Ju Ju Man by Little Howlin' Wolf

Monster Surf Party by The Barbarellatones
Don't Touch by Andre Williams
Snack Crack by Wild Billy Childish & The Musicians of the British Empire
X-Ray Glasses by The Scaners
Free Money by Patti Smith
Soy un Bruto by ET Explore Me
The Devil in the Dance Hall by Harvey McLaughlin
Devil's at Red's by Anthony Leon & The Chain
Hard Travelin' by Simon Stokes

No, I'm Iron Man by The Butthole Surfers
Batman Theme by Iggy Pop
This Wonderful Day by Kyra
Conway Twitty by Johnny Dowd
The Fruit Man by Ween
Springtime in nthe Rockies by Tiny Tim & Brave Combo
Boot That Thing by Roosevelt Sykes & Henry Townsend
The Good Old World (Waltz) by Tom Waits
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

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FOLK REMEDY Playlist


Sunday, May 5, 2017
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
8 am to 10 am Sundays Mountain Time
Substitute Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM

Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org
Here's the playlist :
Thank You Jesus by The Gospel Songbirds
Bold Marauder by Richard & Mimi Farina
Uncle Ned Don't Lose Your Head by Lonnie Johnson
Norah's Dove by Richie Havens
Green Green Rock Road by Oscar Isaasc
Cocaine Blues by Dave Van Ronk
Geeshie by The Mekons
Skinny Leg Blues by Geeshie Wiley
Big Zombie by Chivalrous Amoekons
I Know You Rider by Linda Smith

Me and My Friend the Cat by Loudon Wainwright III
That's the Way Love Goes by The Harmony Sisters
Louise by Ramblin' Jack Elliott & Tom Waits
Baby Please Don't Go by Eddie "One String" Jones
Take This Hmmer by Jon Langford
Cat's Eye / Prairie Dog Town by Tom Adler
Jimbo Jambo Land by Shorty Godwin

Blind Willie McTell by The Band
Dyin' Crapshooter Blues by Blind Willie McTell
Find Blind Lemon (Parts 1 & 2) by Geoff Muldaur
See That My Grave is Kept Clean by  Blind Lemon Jefferson
Ode to Billy Joe by Bobby Gentry
Clothes Line Saga by Bob Dylan

Old Devil Time by Pete Seeger
I Got Mine by Frank Stokes
Minglewood Blues by Cannon's Jug Stompers
Shout You Cats by Hezekiah Jenkins
Pie in the Sky by Utah Phillips & Annie DiFranco
Tears Come Rollin' Down by Henry Townsend
Wildebeast by The Handsome Family

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Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

Wednesday, May 01, 2019

WACKY WEDNESDAY: Super Songs

Are there any songs out there about MY favorite super hero?
OK, this Wacky Wednesday was inspired by a recent discussion on the Dr. Demento Show Facebook page. Someone asked for songs about super heroes and the response was colossal.

Some of the ones you'll see below were posted in that thread. Others are just old favorites of mine (because I'm a pretty super guy). Some were both.

Let's start with the old San Francisco hippie band Mother Earth and this song by member Powell St. John that talks about lots of superfolk. It's called "Marvel Group."




Lots of artist have covered Neal Hefti's theme from a very popular TV show in the '60s. But none did it better than Iggy.



Sun Ra must have been a big Batman fan. Not only did he do an entire album of instrumental songs inspired by the caped crusader with members of the Blues Project (under the name "The Sensational Guitars of Dan & Dale") he did this song with James Jacson on vocals:



In the '90s, The Ramones made the Spiderman theme their own. Joey was very sympathetic to Peter Parker, having once himself been bitten by a radioactive cockroach.



There have been many songs about, or at least inspired by Superman, not even counting that detestable one by the Crash Test Dummies.) But this one, which introduced the world to Laurie Amderson, is my surreal favorite.



Sweet Jayne celebrates the biggest female super-being



"Wait a second, I'm Iron Man. How come you always get to be Iron Man?"



And here's another TV show theme, which I first heard on one of those floppy vinyl discs when I joined The Merry Marvel Marching Society as a youngster.





Sunday, April 28, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST






Sunday, April 28, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Shake a Tail Feather by Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels
Have Love Will Travel by The Sonics
Route 1 Box 144 by Johnny Cash
Breathless by Jerry Lee Lewis
Blood by REQ'D
Good Things by Sleater-Kinney
Girl from '62 by Thee Headcoats
Unable to See the Good by The Buff Medways
Scepter by Sleeve Cannon
Travelin' Mood by Wee Willie Wayne

She's Wild by The Vagoos
Let Me Out by Mark Sultan
The Rocky Road to Dublin by The Tossers
Fish Heads by Barnes & Barnes
Break the Spell by Gogol Bordello
Bold Marauder by Drywall
Hypothetical Life by Grey City Passengers
Mexican Garage by Archie & The Bunkers

Almost Enough by Jason Ringenberg
The Dumb Song by Dale Watson
Last Train to Sanesville by Martha Fields
Never Did No Wanderin' by The Folksmen
New Dream by Lonesome Shack
Walking the Floor by Johnny Dowd
I Have a Mother (Don't Need Another) by The Polkaholics
I Come to Praise His Name by Leo "Bud" Welch
I Can't Control Myself by The Troggs
The Christian Thing by Jono Manson, Terry Allen & Eliza Gilkyson

Andromeda by The Mekons
The Olde Trip to Jerusalem by Chivalrous Amoekons
Carry Me by The Yawpers
I Pity the Poor Immigrant by Richie Havens
Jenny of Oldstones by Florence & The Machine
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

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Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

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Thursday, April 25, 2019

TERRELL'S TUNE-UP: Dale, Jason & Martha

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
April 26, 2018




Let me riff on the old Wolf Brand Chili ad from decades ago: Neighbor, how long has it been since you read a big steaming Terrell’s Tune-up column entirely devoted to country music?

Well, that’s too long! So here is a look at three fine hillbilly albums I’ve been listening to lately.

* Call Me Lucky by Dale Watson. If there’s a better, more authentic, harder working and more
prolific purveyor of old fashioned honky-tonk music than Watson, I sure haven’t heard of him or her. He’s a little guy with a big white pompadour and a powerful baritone, similar to that of Waylon Jennings, though sometimes reminiscent of Johnny Cash.

He’s got humor and soul, an amazing (and amazingly consistent) band and a work ethic that would put most of us to shame. I’ve seen him play the Continental Club in Austin on both Christmas and Thanksgiving nights and once saw him at the Broken Spoke in the Texas capital play three hours without taking a break.

And the records keep coming. By my count, this is his sixth album since 2015. Among his recent discography there’s a duet with Ray Benson, a covers album, a live album and one featuring of re-recordings of his old songs.

In the past year or so, Watson bought a second home, so he now splits his residency between Austin and Memphis. And yes, you can hear echoes of both Sun rockabilly and Stax soul in Lucky (though not as much as his 2011 offering The Sun Sessions, which was recorded at the studio where Elvis, Jerry Lee, Johnny Cash and Cash made their magic.)

A few songs, including “Tupelo, Mississippi & a ’57 Fairlane,” “Inside View” and “Who Needs This Band” feature a horn section. Willie Nelson’s harmonica man Mickey Rafael, sort-of a one-man horn section himself,  graces some songs here, including “Johnny and June,” on which Watson trades lines of love with his real-life girlfriend Celine Lee.

In two songs here, Watson jokingly questions his own intelligence. “I know that I’m not smarter than nearly anyone / I’m just lucky,” he sings in the title track. And backed by a classic Johnny Cash chunka-chunka beat in “The Dumb Song” Watson pokes fun at his own dumb habits like drinking, smoking and eating “that Southern fried chicken.”

But don’t be fooled. Dale is far from dumb. And if you’re smart you’ll give this album a listen.

* Stand Tall by Jason Ringenberg. With Jason & The Scorchers, the band that made him famous (well, kinda famous) Ringenberg is the guy who brought cow-punk to Nashville. No question he’s a rocker, but he’s got country in his heart. That was obvious even back in the days when he was sporting a Mohawk along with a red sparkly C&W jacket. And it’s even more obvious on this, his latest solo album.

Starting off with the spaghetti-western style instrumental title song, this album is populated with hard-edged honky-tonkers like “Many Happy Hangovers to You,” an emotional cover of Jimmie Rodgers’ “Hobo Bill’s Last Ride,” a sweet acoustic, fiddle-colored ode to nature, “Here in the Sequoias” and a country-waltz version of Bob Dylan’s “Farewell Angelina.”

There are songs praising The Ramones – based on the time The Scorchers backed them on a 1982 Texas tour – environmentalist pioneer John Muir and John the Baptist, (who Ringenberg says “was a real humdinger.”)

This is not nearly as political his last proper solo record, 2004’s Empire Builders, (I’m not counting his children’s records he’s released under the name of “Farmer Jason) there’s a fife-and-drums Civil War ballad, “I’m Walking Home,” which is anti-war as well as anti-slavery and pretty radical all around.  “Well I hated slavery and all that support it / But I hate the Union for what it’s become,” the Confederate deserter sings.

* Dancing Shadows by Martha Fields. For the past several years, the West Virginia-born Fields has
made the very best country music coming out of France. Maybe even the whole European Union. And I believe this album, released late last year, is the expatriate hillbilly’s best –at least so far. Her band may be French, but they sound like true Americans to me.

Some of the songs here deal with being a foreigner, such as the lonesome “Paris to Austin” (that contains the line “I’ll pretend the Eifel Tower is a big oil well”) and the bluesy “Exile,” in which Fields sings, “I’m a stranger in my homeland / So afraid for my homeland / And I hurt for what I’ve left behind …”

There are a couple of nostalgic tunes for her past homes, the bluegrass-touched “West Virginia in My Bones,” and the slow aching, acoustic “Oklahoma on My Mind.” However I like up-tempo, country-rockers like “Last Train to Sanesville” (I missed that train years ago!), the dobro-driven “Demona,” and the bluegrass stomp “Maxine.”

But the one I keep going back to is the truthfully titled romp called “Hillbilly Bop.” My favorite verse is where she sings, “Well brother’s got the moonshine, Daddy’s got molasses / Get off your hillbilly asses / You gotta hillbilly bop …”

Here are some videos

First a live version of the title song of Dale's latest.



Jason scorches The Ramones



Martha shows how the Hillbilly Bop is done



And yes, tracks from all three of these albums, plus a lot more, can be heard on a recent episode of The Big Enchilada. In fact, I named the episode after a certain Martha Fields song. Listen and/or download HERE or just listen below:



THROWBACK THURSDAY: Happy Birthday Jerry Leiber!


Leiber & Stoller with The Coasters and others. Jerry's at the piano on the left
 (the one without the goatee.)

Jerry Leiber, who with partner Mike Stoller constituted half of what I believe to be the greatest songwriting team of the rock 'n' roll era, would have been 86 today.

The New York Times talked about Leiber & Stoller in Jerry's obit after he died in 2011:

The team of Leiber and Stoller was formed in 1950, when Mr. Leiber was still a student at Fairfax High in Los Angeles and Mr. Stoller, a fellow rhythm-and-blues fanatic, was a freshman at Los Angeles City College. With Mr. Leiber contributing catchy, street-savvy lyrics and Mr. Stoller, a pianist, composing infectious, bluesy tunes, they set about writing songs with black singers and groups in mind.

In 1952, they wrote “Hound Dog” for the blues singer Big Mama Thornton. The song became an enormous hit for Elvis Presley in 1956 and made Leiber and Stoller the hottest songwriting team in rock ’n’ roll. They later wrote “Jailhouse Rock,”“Loving You,”“Don’t,” “Treat Me Nice,” “King Creole” and other songs for Presley, despite their loathing for his interpretation of “Hound Dog.”

In the late 1950s, having relocated to New York and taken their place among the constellation of talents associated with the Brill Building, they emerged as perhaps the most potent songwriting team in the genre.

In honor of Jerry's birthday, here are  just a handful of my favorite  Leiber & Stoller songs.

Let's start out with one about my town, as performed by Hank Snow



I used to perform this Lavern Baker favorite one myself back in the day



Leiber & Stoller wrote this for The Drifters. But I've always loved Neil Young's version. "Give me some of that crack!"



And this one was for the Coasters, but Sam the Sham did a good job on it



Speaking of The Coasters, nearly all the songs we remember them for were penned by Jerry & Mike. On this one, the dynamic duo were aided by the great Doc Pomus, one of the other great songwriters of that era.



Leiber & Stoller also were responsible for a lot more Elvis songs than "Hound Dog." This one, the title song from his second movie,  is one of the King's most lovely ballads:



Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Here's the latest Big Enchilada

THE BIG ENCHILADA



Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, you had to walk into The Big Enchilada Podcast. You'll be shocked—shocked—to find that crazy rocking is going on in here! We'll always have The Big Enchilada. Here's looking at you, kid! 

And remember, The Big Enchilada is officially listed in the iTunes store. So go subscribe, if you haven't already (and gimme a good rating and review if you're so inclined.) Thanks. 

SUBSCRIBE TO ALL RADIO MUTATION PODCASTS |

Here's the playlist:

(Background Music: Ace Vypyr by The Moths)
I Just Might Crack by April March with The Makers
I Walked All Night by The Cramps
Up All Night by Black Mambas
Broken Clocks by Brad Marino
One More Moment Gone by Eric Amble & Roscoe's Gang
Gonna Love My Baby Now by T. Tex Edwards & The Swingin' Kornflake Killers
The Hippies Killed the Polka Stars by The Polkaholics

(Background Music: Dragnet Polka by Kenny Bass & His Polka Poppers)
Upside Mine by Billy Childish & Holly Golightly
Come into my Life by Thee Mighty Caesars
Elevator by Boss Hog
Little Blonde Girl by Any Dirty Party
Shanty Tramp by The A-Bones
Dirty Mother For You Don't You Know by Henry Townsend & Roosevelt Sykes

(Background Music: Polygraph Test by The Guy Hamper Trio)
Mot Alt Som Du Ar For by Djävulen Möblerar Om
Make Some Time With You by John Schooley
Dig Me, Baby by E.T. Explore Me
Mrs. McKee by The Boss Mustangs
Me and J.G. Ballard by Dan Melchior's Broke Review
Bothering Me by The Morlocks
(Background Music: Ghost Train by The Stompin' Riff Raffs)

Play it here:



Sunday, April 21, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST






Sunday, April 21, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Eggs on Plate by Iggy Pop
Are You for Real by Question Mark & The Mysterians
I'm Not Afraid of Life by The Ramones
Car by REQ'D
54/40 or Fight by Dead Moon
Let Him Try by April March
Fate of a Gambler by Laino & Broken Seeds
Bad Little Woman by The Shadows of Night
Fire in My Bones by 13th Floor Elevators
The Ballad of John & Yoko by The Beatles

In a Parallel World by CTMF
Unable to See the Good by The Buff Medways
Take It Easy, Greasy by Bobby Charles
Marijuana Hell by The Rockin' Guys
The Man from Harlem by Cab Calloway
Don't Bogart Me by The Fraternity of Man
Hickoid Heaven by The Hickoids
F*!#in' Up by Neil Young & Crazy Horse

Peter Cottontail by The Bubbadinos
The Temple by Afghan Whigs
King Herod's Song by Alice Cooper
Damned for All Time by Scratch Acid
Human Question by The Yawpers
Ghost Cave Lament by The Flesh Eaters

Be Together by Eleni Mandell
All I Wanna Do by The War & Treaty
Four Gray Walls by Johnny Dowd
Whistle in the Dark by Mojo Ju Ju
After The Rain by The Mekons
Blue Distance by Peter Case
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

WACKY WEDNESDAY: More Cult Classics -- by REAL CULTS


A little more than four years ago, I did a Wacky Wednesday post of music videos by actual cults -- including music from The Children of God, Scientology, the Hare Krishnas and The Christ Family -- a group I'd encountered before in Santa Fe in the early '80s. (However, within a few months of that post, The Christ Family pulled all their videos off YouTube, apparently forever.)

Here's the sequel to that post.

Let's start with something from a 1973 album by Rev. Jimmy Jones' Peoples Temple Choir. This was four years before they drank the not-proverbial Kool-Aid,



Here's a happy little tune called "Gloomy Sunday" from Church of Satan Founder Anton LaVey



California in the '70s must have been a magical place. The Source Family, led by a Sunset Strip health-food restaurant owner called Father Yod (James E. Baker), was the subject of a fascinating 2012 documentary. This guru had his own sanctified psychedelic band called Ya Ho Wha 13. They sounded like this:



Anyone remember Synanon? This was a group founded by Charles E. Dederich in Santa Monica in the late '50s as a drug rehab clinic. But it grew into a cult that became known for violent retribution against critics.

From a 1982 article in the New York Times:

In 1979 Mr. Dederich pleaded no contest to a charge of conspiracy to murder a Los Angeles lawyer by placing a rattlesnake in his mailbox, after the lawyer won a $300,000 suit against Synanon. 

(That lawyer, Paul Morantz, was representing former Synanon members and relatives of members who said they were being held in Synanon against their will. The snake bit Morantz, who was hospitalized for six days.)

But in 1962, years before that unpleasantness with the snake, etc., jazz guitarist Joe Pass recorded an album featuring fellow musician patients at Synanon being treated for heroin addiction. Here's a track from that album, Sounds of Synanon.




Sunday, April 14, 2019

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST






Sunday, April 14, 2019
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
10 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Back from the Shadows Again by Firesign Theatre
Devil Dance by The A-Bones
I'm So Tired (Of Living in the City) by Mystery Lights
Garbageman by William Shatner
All Women are Bad by The Cramps
Mad Man Blues by John Lee Hooker & George Thorogood
She's a Snake by Deadbolt
Joe Strummer's Grave by Wild Billy Childish & The Musicians of the British Empire
I'm Out of Control by The Milkshakes
My Baby Knows by The Cavemen
Silhouettes by Andy Griffith

Typical Day by Cedric Burnside
Night and Fog by Mudhoney
I Walked All Night by The Embers
Weimer Vending Machine / Priest? by The Mekons
Spaced by The Polkaholics
Ballad of The Unknown Instructors by The Unknown Instructors
They're Red Hot (Hot Tamales) by Johnny Shines

Earn Your Heaven / Forgiveness Through Pain by The Yawpers
Black  Temptation / Digging My Grave by The Flesh Eaters
Bloodsucking Freaks by The Bulemics
Have You Ever Spent the Night in Jail by T. Tex Edwards & The Saddletramps
Sacrifice/Let There Be Peace by Bob Mould
The Old Dope Peddler by Tom Lehrer

Dirty Mother For You (Don't You Know) by Henry Townsend & Roosevelt Sykes
I Want to Be at The Meeting by Leo "Bud" Welch
Three Feet Under by Eric Ambel & Roscoe's Game
Dying Breed by Lonesome Bob
Rio by Mike Nesmith
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

FOLK REMEDY PLAYLIST


Sunday, October 7, 2018
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
8 am to 10 am Sundays Mountain Time
Substitute Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM

Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's the playlist :
Gospel Train by Silver Leaf Quartet
Memphis Yodel by Jimmie Rodgers
Up Above My Head by Sister Rosetta Tharpe
Pretty Polly by The Dead Brothers
High Water Everywhere by Taj Mahal
Philadelphia Lawyer by The Maddox Brothers & Rose
I'm Just an Ordinary Man by Henry Townsend
Jesus is on the Mainline by Leo "Bud" Welch
The Indian Tom Tom by Big Chief Henry's Indian String Band
LSD by T. Tex Edwards & Out on Parole

Canned Heat Blues by Sloppy Henry
Atlanta Bound by Gene Autry
On the Way Downtown by Peter Case
Fixin' to Die Blues by Bukka White
Sissy Man Blues by Kokomo Arnold
With Her Head Tucked Underneath Her Arm by Jim Kweskin
My Rose Marie (A Soldier's Tale) by Stan Ridgway
Pigfork Jamboree by The Imperial Rooster

RUINATION DAY SET 

April the 14th by Gillian Welch
Booth Killed Lincoln by Cisco Houston
God Moves on the Water by Blind Willie Johnson
Ruination Day Part 2 by Gillian Welch
The Great Dust Storm by Woody Guthrie

That's My Rabbit, My Dog Caught It by The Walters Famiy
Moanin' the Blues by Allen Shaw
Snake Farm by Ray Wylie Hubbard

Bloody Mary Morning by Willie Nelson
The Ballad of Thunder Road by Robert Mitchum
Last Train to Sanesville by Martha Fields
Hobo Bill's Last Ride by Jason Ringenberg
Who Needs This Man by Dale Watson
Tell the King the Killer's Here by Ronny Elliott
Comin' Down by The Meat Puppets


Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast! CLICK HERE

Friday, April 12, 2019

TERRELL'S TUNE-UP: Romping with The Yawpers and The Flesh Eaters

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican 
April 12, 2018





One of my surprise favorite albums of the past few years was Boy in the Well by a trio of Colorado roots rockers called The Yawpers. I’d heard this group’s music several times, even saw them do a live set at the annual Bloodshot Records party at the Yard Dog Gallery in Austin a year or two before the album came out. I’d considered their music OK — tolerable, interesting in spots, but nothing that really knocked my socks off.

But then sometime in the late summer of 2017, I heard a couple of cuts from Boy in the Well, and something clicked. I went back and listened to the whole album, a collection of songs that told a strange story of the bastard son of an American soldier and French farm girl in World War I.

As I wrote in this column back then, I found traces of the Legendary Shack Shakers, the Gun Club, and ZZ Top. (I could list more possible audible ingredients: Mudhoney? Wilco? The James Gang?) In any case, I never did find those socks I’d been wearing that day.

So when the new Yawpers album, Human Question, sprang forth, I was looking forward to it, and just a little afraid I would be disappointed. That fear was unjustified. If anything, I like the new one even more than Boy in the Well.

Unlike their previous album, this is no concept album with a storyline to stick to, though at least a couple of cuts seem to be dealing with singer and chief Yawpers songwriter Nate Cook’s divorce. It’s just good, raw, blues-infused music. It grabbed me and refused to let go in the opening seconds of the locomotive onslaught of “Child of Mercy,” which deals with the putrid pangs of romantic collapse. “… a child of mercy, all the shades are drawn/Flies on the wall and all the furniture’s gone,” Cook sings.

This is followed by an even more brutal romp, “Dancing on My Knees,” which sounds like it came from the border of proto-metal and garage rock. Cook spits, “In the struggle since the altar/the world has taken shape/I’ve found the words I’m looking for but they came a little late .../I’m on to greener pastures/but my neck is in the weeds/I’ve taken all the medicine, but I’ve still got your disease.”

Things get weird in the playful, psychedelic-leaning “Earn Your Heaven.” Here, at the end of a crazed, funky wah-wah guitar solo, Cook shouts — for reasons that escape me — “Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the crucifixion Harry Connick Jr.!” I’m not sure whether poor Harry is the one being crucified or if he’s just providing a musical backdrop for the spectacle.

While I mostly like the Yawper’s rowdier tunes, there are a handful of slower ones that are hard-hitting. One is the soul-soaked “Carry Me,” the type of song you could imagine being covered by Solomon Burke. It starts off quietly and builds to thunder. Somewhere toward the end of that road, there’s a heartbreaking sax solo as Cook screams in the background.

This song is followed by one of the craziest rockers on the record, “Forgiveness Through Pain,” featuring Cook’s rapid-fire vocals, distorted guitar noise from lead guitarist Jesse Parmet, and Alex Koshak’s bloodthirsty drums.

Between Human Question, the Flesh Eaters’ reunion (keep reading), and the latest Mekons record (yes, I’m still slobbering over Deserted), I’d have to say rock ’n’ roll is off to a great start this year.

Now I think I’d better go buy some new socks.

Also recommended:

* I Used to Be Pretty by The Flesh Eaters. Here’s a band that rose up during the pioneer days of the great LA punk rock explosion of the early 1980s, a supergroup, really, that in some incarnations would include a who’s who of Southern California punk and roots rock.

The Flesh Eaters had a revolving door of a lineup through the years, but now frontman Chris Desjardins (known as “Chris D,” no relation to Chuck) is back with the same basic band that recorded the critically acclaimed, but still relatively obscure A Minute to Pray, a Second to Die, the group’s second album, released in the year of our Lord, 1981. Players include members of X (the band, not the brand) John Doe (bass) and D.J. Bonebrake (playing marimbas here); Dave Alvin (guitar) and Bill Bateman (drums) of The Blasters, and Steve Berlin of both Los Lobos and The Blasters (sax). Desjardins’ ex-wife and longtime Flesh Eater Julie Christensen also lends some vocals here.

So, yes, it’s a supergroup. And fittingly, the album is downright super. Desjardins — whose voice sounds as if he’s just woken up from a nightmare — and his cronies capture the spirit of the unique bluesy, noirish sounds they were making back at the dawn of the Reagan years. It’s a little more polished than A Minute to Pray, but still powerful and a little bit frightening.

There are some cover songs, including tunes we’ve previously heard by the likes of the Gun Club (another LA band frequently compared to The Flesh Eaters), The Sonics, and Peter Green-era Fleetwood Mac. And there are re-recordings of a few old Flesh Eaters songs, including “Miss Muerte” and “Pony Dress.”

The best songs here are the ones where Desjardins and band get spooky and slinky like they do on “House Amid the Thickets,” where the combination of Alvin’s hard-knuckle blues guitar and Bonebrake’s marimba brings back memories of Frank Zappa’s Ruth Underwood period, and “The Youngest Profession,” on which Desjardins commands “Go crazy!” and both Alvin and Berlin do just that.

And speaking of spooky, the 13-minute “Ghost Cave Lament” is a grand finale and an instant epic. You will believe that flesh has been eaten in that cave.

Here are some videos:

First, The Yawpers



And now some Flesh Eaters ...






Thursday, April 11, 2019

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Remembering Idi Amin




Forty years ago today, His Excellency, President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Seas and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular -- aka, the uncrowned king of Scotland -- was forced to flee from his native Uganda and give up the power he enjoyed and abused for nearly a decade.

Encyclopedia Britannica said of Amin, "He was noted for his abrupt changes of mood, from buffoonery to shrewdness, from gentleness to tyranny. He was often extreme in his nationalism."

Good thing that could never happen here ...

Encyclopedia Britannica also says, "Amin came to be known as the “Butcher of Uganda” for his brutality, and it is believed that some 300,000 people were killed and countless others tortured during his presidency."

By late 1978, the Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Seas etc. had made the stupid mistake of invading neighboring Tanzania. That country launched a counter attack that eventually drove him out of the country. Amin escaped first to Libya, then eventually he settled in Saudi Arabia.

He died and went to Hell in 2003.

At least he left behind some fine songs in his "honor."

This one is from a 1975 British comedy album called The Collected Broadcasts of Idi Amin. Comedian John Bird is on vocals




Here's a Spanish band called Mortimer who recorded this in the mid '70s.




The late Texas singer-songwriter Blaze Foley had opinions about Amin as well. He expressed them in his song "Springtime in Uganda."




Then there's this one, featuring Chuck E. Weiss and his pal Tom Waits





Tuesday, April 09, 2019

Santa Fe Bandstand 2019 Schedule

Outside In Productions just announced this summer's Santa Fe Bandstand schedule.

Shinyribs at 2018 South by Southwest 
Ad it's going to kick off with none other than Shinyribs!

In a magnificent act of copy-and-paste, here's that schedule:


• Opening Night with SHINYRIBS (June 19): Shinyribs is an American country-soul, swamp-funk band. Known for his outrageous outfits and on-stage antics, front man Kevin Russell delivers a rousing dance party of a show that’s impossible to forget. Winners of “Best Austin Band” at the 2019 Austin Music Awards.

PETER ROWAN AND THE FREE MEXICAN AIRFORCE with LOS TEXMANIACS (June 22): Grammy-award winner Peter Rowan comes back to Old Santa Fe for his 3rd Bandstand appearance. For this special show, Peter will be backed by New Mexico’s own Grammy winning conjunto band Max Baca y Los Texmaniacs.

LA MERA CANDELARIA (June 27): This LA-based band fuses cumbia with the relaxed vibes of son cubano, creating a refreshing new musical mix. Founder Stephani Candelaria hopes her lyrics, which tackle queer relationships and gender roles, inspire cultural change in her community.

JIM LAUDERDALE (July 10): Jim Lauderdale is a 2-time Grammy winning Americana icon, a singer-songwriter whose unmistakable rhinestone-incrusted silhouette has been a symbol for creative integrity and prolificacy for
thirty-one albums over decades of recording.
Terrance Simien at Santa Fe Bandstand, June 2014

TERRANCE SIMIEN AND THE ZYDECO EXPERIENCE (July 16): For 35 years, two- time Grammy award winning artist Terrance Simien, 8th generation Louisiana Creole has been shattering the myths about what his indigenous Zydeco roots music is – and is not. Don’t miss this special Cajun dance party.

AL HURRICANE, JR. (July 20 at SWAN Park): Affectionately known as "The Godson" of New Mexico Music, Al Huricane Jr. proves the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, having created numerous solo albums and
contributed such celebrated songs as "Flor De Las Flores" to New Mexico's unique style of Spanish music.

AMY HELM (July 24): Amy Helm is an American singer-songwriter and daughter of The Band drummer Levon Helm and singer Libby Titus. She is a past member of the Levon Helm's Midnight Ramble Band and Ollabelle.

LOS STRAITJACKETS (August 1): Mixing the familiar sounds of Dick Dale, Duane Eddy, and the Ventures, Los Straitjackets create their own version of energetic surf guitar twang, complete with Mexican wrestling masks.

ELIZA GILKYSON (August 7): Eliza Gilkyson is a twice Grammy-nominated (2006/2015) singer songwriter and activist who is one of the most respected musicians in Folk, Roots and Americana circles.

DAVINA AND THE VAGABONDS (August 8): With influences ranging from Fats Domino and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band to Aretha Franklin and Tom Waits, Davina and the Vagabonds have grown from a down-and-dirty
blues band into one of the most exciting acoustic ensembles on the international stage.

Wednesday, April 03, 2019

WACKY WEDNESDAY: Taco Bell, Home of the Superstars


So where does a big music star with big financial problems go for help? If it's the early '90s, apparently they ran to the Border to pitch for Taco Bell.

That's what Willie Nelson did in 1992 when the IRS Hell Hound was on his trail. Listen to Willie sing the praises of the Woman with the Rose Tattoo -- and also Steak Burrito Supremes:



Rapper M.C. Hammer also made Taco Bell ads. But unlike Willie, Hammer's financial crisis happened a couple of years or so after he'd made commercials for Taco Bell (and KFC, and Pepsi.) So maybe Hammer actually liked crappy tacos.



Here's another ... direct from Lake Edna!



I'm not exactly sure why Little Richard jumped on the taco wagon.



Monday, April 01, 2019

Lots of Hillbilly Boppin' on the New Big Enchilada!

THE BIG ENCHILADA



Back to the hills and hollers for another Big Enchilada hillbilly episode. Real country music old as well as new, pure as well as mutated. For those who miss The Santa Fe Opry, hold this one close to your heart.

And remember, The Big Enchilada is officially listed in the iTunes store. So go subscribe, if you haven't already (and gimme a good rating and review if you're so inclined.) Thanks. 

SUBSCRIBE TO ALL RADIO MUTATION PODCASTS |

Here's the playlist:

(Background Music: Charlotte Breakdown by Don Reno)
Hillbilly Bop by Martha Fields
Hey Joe! by Carl Smith
That Little Honky Tonk Queen by Moe Bandy & Joe Stampley
Bottom Dollar Boy by Vandoliers
What Do You Do When You're Lonesome by Wanda Jackson
Be Real by Freda & The Firedogs
Possum Man by The Brothers Covelle

(Background Music: Brownie's Stomp by Milton Brown & His Musical Brownies )
Call Me Lucky by Dale Watson
Miss Atomic Bombshell 1949 by Miss Celine Lee
Hobo Bill's Last Ride by Jason Ringenberg
Past the Ditch by Lonesome Shack
Wonky by Reverend Horton Heat
Poor Until Payday by The Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band
(Background Music: Fort Smith Breakdown by Luke Hignight & His Ozark Strutters)

Room 309 by Reverend Billy C. Wirtz
Diddy Boppin' and Motor Mouthin' by Clara Dean
One Step Nearer to You by Margie Singleton
Don't Fix Up the Dog House by George McCormick
Don't That Road Look Rough and Rocky by The Osborne Brothers
(Background Music: Border Ride by Jim & Jesse)


Play it HERE:


WACKY WEDNESDAY: A Little Shot of Bollywood

It's been several years since I did a Bollywood post on Wacky Wednesday, so why the heck not. As I said before, I don't speak H...