Thursday, July 09, 2020

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Happy Birthday, Eddie Dean


One hundred thirteen years ago in a town called Posey, Texas, one of America's most famous singing cowboys was born.

Happy birthday, Eddie Dean!

According to his obituary in The Los Angeles Times, Dean, born Eddie Dean Glosup, started his career in vaudeville. He got a radio show in Tulsa, Okla. in 1930, then went on to the National Barn Dance show in Chicago.

His movie career began in the 1930s.

From his obituary:

Known as the golden-throated cowboy for an exceptionally melodious voice, Dean appeared in more than 30 Western movies starting in 1936. In the 1940s he was among the 10 most popular cowboy stars and was the first singing cowboy to do movies in color. ... 

Most critics agreed that Dean’s singing was the best part of his movies. He possessed, in the words of one critic, “one of the better sets of pipes among cowboy Carusos.” The late Gene Autry, with whom Dean appeared in several movies, once said he had the best voice of all the cowboy singers. ...

Here's a tune from Eddie's 1947 film The Tioga Kid. Though he says there ain't no gal got a brand on me," in real life, a gal named Lorene Donnelly "Dearest" Dean was married to him from 1930 until his death in 1999.



Here's an older Eddie performing perhaps the greatest song he ever wrote, "One Has My Name, (The Other Has My Heart)." I actually prefer Jerry Lee Lewis' version the best, but this is fantastic in its own right. His wife was one of the songwriters.



Here's one for Santa Fe ...



Though born in Texas, Eddie apparently had a thing for Northern New Mexico. Equal time for Taos here.



And this one might be about New Mexico. The lyrics don't specify which part of the San Juan River he's thinking of, but lets pretend it's the northwest New Mexico section.



One thing I do know: If there's a Hillbilly Heaven, Eddie's there.



Tuesday, July 07, 2020

Chicken Shack Playlist



Tuesday, July 7, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays Mountain Time
Substitute Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :
Hot Tamales by Bobby Hatfield
Big Man by Carl Matthews
Wine O Wine by The Gators
It’s Gettin’ Kinda Chilly by Slam Stewart & Slim Gaillard
Mississippi Goddamn by Nina Simone

But I Was Cool by Oscar Brown, Jr.
Hey Hey Girl by Rosco Gordon
Don’t Worry About Me by Willie Cobbs
It’s a Lowdown Dirty Shame by Louis Jordan
Sixty Minute Man Part 2 by Rufus Thomas

Git to Gitten’, Baby by Wynonie Harris
Dance With a Dolly (With a Hole in Her Stocking) by Louis Prima
Pachuco Boogie by Don Tosti’s Boogie Boys
Say You Love Me by The Dukays
Tomorrow Night by Champion Jack Dupree
All These Things by Art Neville

Shake Your Tailfeathers by Ray Charles with The Blues Brothers
The Way You Dog Me Around by Andre Williams with The A-Bones
Rockin’ the Coconut by Barrence Whitfield & The Savages
I Just Dropped In to See What Condition My Condition Was In by Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings

The Pigmy Grind Part 1 by Sonny Dublin
Monkey Dog by O.V. Wright
You’re the Dog by Irma Thomas
Let Me Down Easy by Bettye LaVette

It Ain’t What You Say by Little Esther
Dip Baby Dip by The Cymbols
Rattlesnake, Baby, Rattlesnake by Joe Johnson
Don’t You Ever Let Nobody Drag Yo’ Spirit Down by The Linda Tillery Cultural Heritage Choir with Wilson Picket and Eric Bibb



Sunday, July 05, 2020

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, July 5, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
9 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Wild Angel by James Bong & The Agents
Wrecked by Sleeve Cannon
Holy Night Fever by Deerhoof
Buried Treasure by The Mekons
Shades by Pierced Arrows
Endless Sleep by Tav Falco
Trail of the Lonesome Pine by Laurel & Hardy

Torn Up by Mal Thursday Quintet
Don’t Leave Me Alone by The Jackets
“8” Teen by Question Mark & The Mysterians
So Tired of Being Good by Help Me Devil
Papa Did the Chicken by Little Sammy
Poder Vivir by The Mavericks
Coconut Island by Pierre Omer’s Swing Revue

Noże I Pistolety by Kazik Staszewski
When the Levee Breaks by Mojo Nixon
TV by Lucy & The Rats
Your Haunted Head by Concrete Blonde
Mystery Dance by Elvis Costello
Evil Operations Classified by The Casual Dots
Firecracker by Half Japanese
Teddy Bears’ Picnic by Nitty Gritty Dirt Band
The Return of the Pretty One by Lord Sundance

Pariah Radio by Chubby & The Gang
Strawberry by Butthole Surfers
I Am Well and Missing You by Women of the Night
Fancy by The Geraldine Fibbers
Hard to Meet Ya by Skip Church
Tail Dragger by Howlin’ Wolf
There is Power in the Blues by James Blood Ulmer
Do the Clam by The Cramps
Who Walks In When I Walk Out by Ray Noble

Maman N’aime Pas Ma Musique by Tony Truant & The Fleshtones
Jim Cole by The Oblivians
Ghost in the Trees by Thee Oh Sees
Bobby Booshay by Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears
Government Center by Jonathan Richman
Inside Looking Out by Eric Burdon & The Animals
Bumble Bee by Heavy Trash
Saved by Lavern Baker
She’s Got a Wobble When She Walks by Sugar Boy Crawford
Baby, I Am Not Your Lady by Singing Sadie

The Genitalia of a Fool by Cornell Hurd with Justin Trevino
Here I Am Oh Lord, Send Me by Alvin Youngblood Hart
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Backlash Blues by Nina Simone
Old Rugged Cross by John Prine & Mac Wiseman
Indoor Fireworks by Nick Lowe
Tom Traubert’s Blues by Tom Waits

CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Folk Remedy Playlist


Sunday, July 5, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
8 am to 10 am  Sundays Mountain Time
Substitute Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM

Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org
Here's the playlist :
Welcome Table and Prayer by Alice Wine
When the Gate Swings Open by The Heavenly Gospel Singers
That’s All by Sister Rosetta Tharpe
You Don’t Know by The Five Blind Boys of Mississippi
Did He Die in Vain by Sister Wynona Carr
Victory Shall Be Mine by Straight Street Holiness Group
Lord Don’t Let Me Fail by Mahalia Jackson

Ghost in My Boot by Johnny Foodstamp
Crazy Words, Crazy Tune by The Jim Kweskin Jug Band
Beedle Um Bum by Dan Hicks & The Hot Licks with Jim Kweskin
Sweet Potato Blues by King David’s Jug Band
Crawdad Hole by Gus Cannon
The Old Fruit Peddler by Dr. West’s Medicine Show & Junk Band
Bootlegger’s Blues by South Memphis String Band

Shake Sugaree by Elizabeth Cotton with Brenda Evans
I Know One by John Prime & Emmylou Harris
Two Wrongs by Brook Blanche
Come a Little Dog by Palace Brothers
Whispering Pines by Iris DeMent
Whispering Pines by The Band
Angelin’s Farm by Boris McCutcheon
Jump in the River by Holly Golightly & The Brokeoffs
Black Eyed Suzie by Holy Moly Rounders

He Was a Friend of Mine by Rolf Cahn & Eric Von Schmidt
The Last Fish in the Sea by Mini Mekons with Robbie Fulks
Whispering Sea by Eilen Jewell
Rose Conolly by Peter Case
Me and Rose Connolly by Rachel Brooke
Far from Any Road by The Handsome Family
Groundhog by Doc Watson & Gaither Carlton
Lift Him Up, That’s All by Washington Phillips
Tiny Island by Leo Kottke


Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast! CLICK HERE
Steve Terrell is proud to report to the monthly Freeform American Roots Radio list

Wednesday, July 01, 2020

WACKY WEDNESDAY: She Was Only the Dictator's Daughter


Googoosha in happier days

If you were writing a screenplay for a James Bond movie, you could come up with a far worse idea for a villain than the gorgeous daughter of a brutal, authoritarian Eurasian dictator who fancied herself an international pop star, but whose real job was running a major extortion and money-laundering operation.

But this is no spy thriller. It's the real-life story of Gulnara Karimova, daughter of Islam Karinova, the late dictator of the great nation of Uzbekistan.

She once was considered a probably successor to her brutal, corrupt father. But Gulnara's life turned into a horror show back in 2014, when, following a feud with daddy, was put under house arrest. The old despot's death in 2016 didn't help her.

In December  2017  a jury sentenced Gulnara 2017 to 10 years in prison on corruption charges.

And just last March, Uzbekistan's Supreme Court announced she'd been convicted of a slew of new charges of extortion, money laundering, misappropriating the property of others, and financial and other crimes. Before that conviction she reportedly sent a letter to the Uzbek government offering to return nearly $700 million to her country's treasury in exchange for dismissal of the charges. That didn't work.

But this is a music blog, not a foreign affairs journal. So I'm concerned here with Gulnara's alter-ego, the glamorous, dazzling musical powerhouse called Googoosha, who earlier this century foisted her own brand of Euro pablum pop onto the languishing citizens of Uzbekistan.

The critics raved:

Like so many single-named dance-music divas, the singer who performs under the hard-voweled alias Googoosha seems to exist in a cocoon of gauzy glamour shots, haute couture, and spot-lit soundstages. Unlike Ke$ha, Rihanna, Madonna, Shakira, Ciara, and Beyoncé, however, Googoosha’s output of grinding Euro disco and cheesy pop videos has barely registered on the cultural radar outside her homeland, Uzbekistan.

And there, according to a 2012 profile in the Daily Beast, Gurnara/Googoosha "is viewed as a `robber baron' by the majority of Uzbeks and is considered `the single most-hated person in the country.' "

Here are some samples of Googoosha's music from her happier days.






This one is a duet with the great French actor Gerard Depardieu:



Speaking of duets, what do Googoosha and Willie Nelson have in common? They've both done duets with Willie Nelson!



Here in the good old USA probably the closest thing to Googoosha we currently have is a young lady who dabbled in her own brand of pablum pop before her daddy started running for president. To Tiffany Trump's credit, she didn't try to use her daddy's presidency to promote her musical career and she's never been implicated in an international money laundering schemes.

And to daddy's credit, he didn't place Tiffany under house arrest after she recently posted a black square in support of justice for George Floyd on Instagram.



Just imagine a cheese-pop super group of Googoosha and Tiffany after Ms. Karinova gets out of prison.

Thanks to my brother Jack for introducing me to the magic of Googoosha. He met her in person years before her fall.


Sunday, June 28, 2020

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, June 28, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
9 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Bad Boy by The Backbeat Band
Why Don’t You Try My Love by Thee Mighty Caesars
Rebound by The Blasters
Diggin’ My Potatoes by Buddy Guy & Junior Wells
The Hunch by Mad Mike & The Maniacs
Secret Rendezvous by The Chocolate Watchband
Cave by Sleeve Cannon

The Snake by Johnny Rivers
Work Song by Oscar Brown, Jr.
Get Up by De Los Muertos
Hombre Secreto by The Plugz
Punk Ass Blues by Simon Stokes & Hammerlock
Long Neck Bottles by Captain Beefheart
Hey Little Girl by The Dead Boys
I Can Move You (If You Can Let Me) by Parliament
My Babe by The Righteous Brothers

Take Me Back to Tulsa by Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys
24 Hours from Tulsa by Gene Pitney
Tulsa Telephone Book by Calexico
Tulsa County by The Byrds
Tulsa by Wayne Hancock
Oklahoma Bound by Joe West
Almost to Tulsa by Junior Brown
Take Me Back to Tulsa by Pine Valley Cosmonauts with The Meat Purveyors

Jemima Surrender by Howard Tate
Electric Aunt Jemima by Frank Zappa & The Mothers of Invention
In a Dirty Cellar by Pirate Love
Crawdaddy Simone by The Syndicats
Cactus by The Pixies
I Loved Her So by Me & Them Guys
Kiss Her Dead by Delaney Davidson
Big Fanny by Big John Hamilton
Done Done the Slop by Ervin Rucker
Ay-Tete-Fe by Clifton Chenier 
Mickey’s Son and Daughter by The BBC Dance Orchestra

America the Beautiful by The Dictators
Shit the Bed by Tex Offenders
Girl Be Steadfast by The Steadfasts
Sadil Come/Tropnalo Oro by 3 Mustaphas 3
Squealin’ Parrot by Vince Edwards
A Thousand Miles Away by The Heartbeats
Dinah Wants Religion by The Fabs
La Bamba by The Plugz
Stand Up by Lee Fields & The Sugarman 3
Don’t You ever Let Nobody Drag Yo’ Spirit Down by Linda Tillery & The Cultural Heritage Choir with Wilson Pickett & Eric Bibb

Dim Lights, Thick Smoke and Loud Loud Music by John Prime & Amanda Shires
Fool About Me by Paul Burch
Escalera by The Mekons
God and The Devil by Jacques & The Shaky Boys
Misery by Brook Blanche
Can’t You See That I’m Soulful by Eleni Mandell
My True Story by The Jive 5
Kiss Yourself For Me by Doris Allen
Feel Like Going’ Home by Charlie Rich
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Thursday, June 25, 2020

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Happy Birthday Zydeco King



Clifton Chenier, widely recognized as the King of Zydeco, would have been 95 years old today.

Happy birthday Clifton!

Just like Bill Monroe basically invented bluegrass music, using elements of the traditional music of his people woven into a distinct new musical style, Chenier was the mad scientist who created zydeco, a music still thriving today.

Here's his life story according to the National Endowment for the Arts, which in 1984 named Chenier a National Heritage Fellow:

Clifton Chenier was born June 25, 1925, in Opelousas, St. Landry Parish, Louisiana. His father, Joseph Chenier, was a local musician who played the accordion at home and at dances known as fais dodos. As a child, Clifton worked on a farm outside Opelousas and was interested in music. He learned the basics of accordion playing from his father, and by the time he was 16 years of age, he was playing the accordion, accompanied by his older brother Cleveland, who played the frottoir (washboard or rub-board) with a metal bottle opener. The frottoir was adapted by early African American Creoles as a rhythm instrument.

Clifton and Cleveland began performing at house dances, where the furniture was often moved aside to make room for the dancers. In time, Clifton shifted from the small diatonic accordion he had learned from his father to the larger and more flexible piano accordion. In time, the percussion in Clifton's bands grew more complex, and he added electric guitars, bass, drums, and saxophone to play larger clubs, dance halls, and juke joints between Houston and New Orleans.

As he matured, Clifton developed his own musical style, one that combined elements of traditional French Creole music with the stylization of rhythm and blues. In 1942, Clifton went to Lake Charles to play in the Clarence Garlow Band. Three years later, he married his wife, Margaret, and in 1946 he moved to Houston to work in the postwar boom.

He soon began performing again at area dances with his brother. In 1954, recording scout J. R. Fulbright, a black recording pioneer, spotted the Chenier brothers and asked them to record for his Elko label, which released a 78 rpm recording of "Louisiana Stomp" and "Clifton's Blues." These two tracks are among the earliest recorded examples of what is now known as zydeco.

In 1955, Clifton signed with Specialty Records, and his first release for that label, "Ay 'Tit Fille" ("Hey Little Girl"), was a rhythm and blues hit throughout the South. Chenier capitalized on its success and took his band, the Zydeco Ramblers, on tour. For the next eight years he recorded with several other regional labels. It wasn't until 1963, however, when he recorded with Arhoolie, a California-based label, that he attained national acclaim. Chris Strachwitz of Arhoolie Records heard Clifton play in Houston, and the next day he recorded "Ay Ai Ai" and "Why Did You Go Last Night?" for Arhoolie at a local studio. The following year Chenier recorded his first album, Louisiana Blues & Zydeco, and quickly became Arhoolie's top-selling artist.

Chenier died in December 1987.

His music is immortal.

Here's his first record, "Louisiana Stomp":



This is a factually correct later tune, "I'm the Zydeco Man":



This is a live clip from the 1977 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival:



Bless his cotton-pickin' heart:



Finally, this always has been one of my favorites. Besides the great performance, I'm also a big fan of the subject matter:







Tuesday, June 23, 2020

A New Hillbilly Episode of The Big Enchilada!

THE BIG ENCHILADA


Out here in the West, it's not hard to see the faces of cowboy phantoms in the shadows. They're everywhere! Here's a rip-roaring musical salute to the spirit of those shadows, featuring some top-notch country, folk, bluegrass, western-swing and rockabilly sounds. This episode is dedicated to the memory of two musical giants who have ascended in the past few months, John Prine and James "Slim" Hand.

Remember, The Big Enchilada still is officially listed in the iTunes store. So go subscribe, if you haven't already (and please, gentle listeners, give me a five-star rating and review if you're so inclined.) Thanks. 

DOWNLOAD SUBSCRIBE | MIXCLOUD FACEBOOK iTUNES! |



Mixcloud is now the official home of Radio Mutation

Here's the playlist:

(Background Music: Tobacco State Swing by Hank Penny)
Devil May Care by Sarah Shook & The Disarmers
I Do Believe I've Had Enough by Zephaniah Ohora & The 18 Wheelers
Alabama Baby by The Armstrong Twins
Those Brown Eyes by J. Michael Combs
Social Distancing by Hamell on Trial


(Background Music: Symphony Hall Rag by John Hartford)
Running Around With You by The Tex Offenders
Sixty Days by Bill Tutt
Hubba Hubba Ding Ding by Dave Del Monte & The Cross County Boys
Fool About Me by Paul Burch
My Untrue Cowgirl by The Swift Jewel Cowboys
I Told You I Love You, Now Get Out by Tom Morrell & The Time-Warp Tophands
Take Me Back to Tulsa by The Pine Valley Cosmonauts with The Meat Purveyors

(Background Music: Hometown Stomp by Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys )
Here Lies a Good Old Boy by James Hand
Trucks, Tractors and Trains by The Dirt Daubers
Your Side by Brook Blanche
He Was a Friend of Mine by Tom Jones 
When I Get to Heaven by John Prine
(Background Music: Magnificent Seven by Jon Rauhouse)

Play it below:

Sunday, June 21, 2020

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, June 21, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
9 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Corn and Grain by The Mekons
I’m Your Man by Richard Hell & The Voidoids
Radio 5 by The Outcrowd
The Crusher by The Novas
Dork at 12 O’Clock by Solex
One Monkey Don’t Stop No Show by Bobby Rush
Skinny Legs and All by Joe Tex

Sugar Sugar by Wilson Pickett
Banana Splits by The Dickies
Bucket T by The Trashmen with Deke Dickerson
All Night by Alex Maryol
Time is a Tale by The Royal Flares
Distemper by The Ar-Kaics
This Train by Linda Gail Lewis
I’ve Got a Tender Heart by Eleni Mandell

Star Chambered by X
Dr. Syn by The Stomachmouths
Lizard Hunt by Gas Huffer
Once Upon a Time in Your Mind by Mal Thursday Quintet
Running Around With You by Tex Offenders
Move It by T. Tex Edwards
I Washed My Hands in Muddy Water by George Thorogood & The Destroyers
Damn Pandemic by Hamell on Trial

FATHER'S DAY SET
That Silver Haired Daddy of Mine by Gene Autry
Papa Was a Steel-Headed Man by Robbie Fulks
Papa Was a Rolling Stone by The Temptations
Pappa Won't Leave You, Henry by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
Daddy, the Swingin' Suburbanite by The Weird-ohs
Drunk Daddy by The Cherry-Poppin’ Daddies
Dad, I'm In Jail by Was (Not Was)

Too Many Bills by Figures of Light
Invisible Friend by The Crypts
Git Back in the Truck by Hickoids
Bob George by Prince
Sexy Ida Part 2 by Ike & Tina Turner
Money (That’s What I Want) by Jerry Lee Lewis

Rusty Cage by Soundgarden
Mephisto and Kevin by Primus
I Never Loved Her by The Starfires
Don’t Drop the Soap by Stan Ridgway
Pretty Polly by Otis Taylor
Somebody’s in Love by Cosmic Rays (with Sun-Ra)
Sycamore Trees by Jimmy Scott
America the Beautiful by Ray Charles
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

WACKY WEDNESDAY: Just Say Julie


MTV was pretty vapid, even in its 1980s heyday. But one constant bright spot back during the Reagan era was Julie Brown, a comedian and actor.

The first time I ever saw her was a hilarious "man-on-the-street" -- or more accurately "man-on-the-beach" interview segment in which a bikini-clad Julie approached guys saying, "Do you think I'm pretty? Could you give me $20?"

Julie also wrote and recorded hilarious songs that became videos ripe for MTV -- and appropriate for Wacky Wednesday.

Julie as Lady Liberty

Some clarification may be in order here. Back in the 80s, MTV was crawling with Julie Browns. There also was the Welch-born  "Downtown" Julie Brown, who hosted something called club MTV and was known for her catchphrase, "Wubba Wubba Wubba." I'm talking about the one born Julie Ann Brown in Van Nuys, Calif. in 1959, the host of MTV's Just Say Julie.

(And to be sure, this isn't about Miami Herald investigative reporter Julie K. Brown whose 2018 series blew open the case against pedophile financier Jeffrey Epstein.)

Here are some of my favorite Julie tunes, starting with this classic, "Trapped in the Body of a White Girl."



"My father's out of Harvard, my brother's out of Yale, well the guy I took home last night just got out of jail."



"Girl Fight Tonight"!



Of course in real life, Julie was a redhead. At least most of the time.



Though this 1984 parody of teenage death songs (you know, "Teen Angel," "Tell Laura I Love Her," "Last Kiss," "Leader of the Pack" etc.) undoubtedly was Julie's best-known song, let's just say it didn't age very well after Columbine and all the other school shootings that have plagued the  country in the past two decades plus.

Still I always chuckle at the line "Stop it, Debbie, you're embarrassing me!"



Sunday, June 14, 2020

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST





Sunday, June 14, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
9 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
God is a Bullet by Concrete Blonde
Mystery Writers by Divine Horsemen
Worry by Alex Maryol
Hooky Wooky by Lou Reed
Sock it to Me, Baby by Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels
James Hand & Me at KSFR
July 7, 2013
A La Carte by James “Red” Holloway

JAMES “SLIM” HAND Tribute

Shadows Where the Magic Was
Mighty Lonesome Man
Devil Ain’t No Quitter

La Carta by Los Mustang
Oooga Booga Baby by 1313 Mockingbird Lane
You Belong to Me by Magic Sam
Apocalypse Girl by Simon Stokes
Bold Marauder by Drywall

Big Trash Day by The Tex Offenders
Strange Words by The Electric Mess
Train of Thought by The Fleshtones
(I’m In With) The Out Crowd by Sam the Sham & The Pharaohs
Burning Farm by Shonen Knife
Let’s Burn Down the Cornfield by John the Conquerer
She Belongs to Me by Bob Dylan
Gaslight by Hammell on Trial

Eve of Destruction by The Dickies
Indian Rope Man by Richie Havens
Don’t Talk to Me by Hank Haint
Wild Wild Women by Tav Falco
Catfish Blues/I Feel Good, Little Girl by Richard Johnson
Rockin’ Bones by Ronnie Dawson
La Caravan by Babylon Circus
Mean Old World by Sam Cooke

Lightning’s Girl by Nancy Sinatra
Nancy Sinatra by Johnny Dowd
Get Down (and Get Stupid) by The Del Gators
The Man Who Rode the Mule Around the World by John Schooley
Time Has Come Today by The Angry Samoans
900 Million People Daily by The Seeds
Lift Every Voice and Sing by Shooby Taylor

Jugtown by Neil Hamburger
Fools on the Barstools by Brook Blanche
One Night of Sin by Elvis Presley
He Was a Friend of Mine by Tom Jones
One Love / People Get Ready/ Sermon by The Neville Brothers
Land of Hope and Dreams by Bruce Springsteen


CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Thursday, June 11, 2020

THROWBACK THURSDAY: He Was a Friend of Mine


Yesterday, my friend Dave pointed me to a brand new video of jug-band guru Jim Kweskin and a young singer named Samoa Wilson singing a moving version of the old song "He Was a Friend of Mine" dedicated to George Floyd, who was killed last month after a Minneapolis police officer held Floyd under his knee for nearly nine minutes.

So I decided to look into the history of this song and was surprised and delighted to learn that I can honestly say this of one of the musicians responsible for reviving this song: 

He was a friend of mine.

I'm talking about the late Rolf Cahn, a longtime Santa Fe resident who, before moving here, was a major force in the folk music scene in San Francisco and Cambridge, Mass. in the 1950s and early '60s 
In 1961, Rolf and his pal Eric Von Schmidt were the first professional musicians to record the song, and the first to call it "He Was a Friend of Mine." It was on their album on Folkways record, which music writer Elijah Ward said "has not been treated well by history but was a seminal source for the folk-blues revivalists of the early 1960s."

Here's Rolf & Eric:



But they didn't write the song. Ward points out that the source was a Texas prison inmate named Smith Casey ("or Smith Cason, or possibly Smith Carson,") who was recorded by John Lomax for the Library of Congress in 1939 at Clemens State Prison Farm in Brazoria, Texas.

Casey called the tune "Shorty George," which Ward says is related to a song by Lead Belly with the same title. (However, Mr. Ledbetter sang, "Shorty George he ain't no friend of mine.")

Here's Casey's song:



After Rolf and Eric recorded it, a young folkie by the name of Bob Dylan recorded it. However, Dylan's version was left off of his first album and didn't see commercial release until Dylan's first "bootleg" box set in 1991.

But Dave Van Ronk released what might be the definitive version on his 1962 album  Dave Van Ronk, Folksinger. As Wald points out, Van Ronk mistakenly credited the song to Bob Dylan.

Here's Van Ronk singing the song at the memorial service for folksinger Phil Ochs in 1976:



In 1964, Bobby Bare took the song to the country:



That same year, British pop singer Petula Clark recorded a French version called "Toi Qui M'As Fait Pleurer" (which translates to "You Who Made Me Cry." Just like Van Ronk mistakenly gave Dylan the songwriter credit, Clark's song credited Bobby Bare as the author. However, the lyrics Petula sang concerned a lost lover, having basically nothing to do with the story Bare, Van Ronk or Casey told.

So just for the hell of it:



The song saw another sharp change when The Byrds recorded it for their 1965 album Turn! Turn! Turn!. They turned it into an emotional lament for the assassinated John F. Kennedy.



Through the ensuing years many musicians have done the song, including  Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Jerry Jeff Walker, Willie Nelson (for the Brokeback Mountain soundtrack), Billy Bob Thornton (who did The Byrds' JFK version), Tom Jones and Cat Power, whose bleak, smokey version is subtly amazing.



But, in light of current events, the version that hit me hardest was the one by Kweskin and Wilson released this week for George Floyd.

"He did not die in vain ..."

If you have to steal away and cry, I won't judge you.




R.I.P. Rolf


For more deep dives into songs, check out The Stephen W. Terrell Web Log Songbook

Sunday, June 07, 2020

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST






Sunday, June 7, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
9 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Street Fighting Man by The Rolling Stones
Made in Santa Fe by Alex Maryol
Got the Skinny by Gino & The Goons
Hubba Hubba Ding Dong by Dave Del Monte & The Cross Country Boys
Pinch Myself by Lucy & The Rats
Evil One by James Blood Ulmer
Muss I Denn by Marlene Dietrich

Clampdown by The Clash
Summertime by Trixie & The Trainwrecks
Joke’s on Me by Mal Thursday Quartet
Stupid Person by Kult
Let Me Holler by King Khan & The Shrines
Take Me to Our Place by Jonny Manak & The Depressives
Topless Bathing Suit by Kelly Rogers
My Country Too by Kell Robertson

Country at War by X
Pyschodelic Nightmare by Dead Moon
Less Bone More Meat by King Salami & The Cumberland 3
I’m Yo Mudda by Ghost Wolves
Everybody’s Gonna Be Happy by The Kinks
Grease Monkey Go by X-Rays
We Don’t Care by The Molting Vultures
Loretta and The Insect World by Giant Sand
Jim Crow Blues by Odetta

This is a Hamell Show by Hamell on Trial
Hit the Road by Scott H. Biram
Hit the Road Jack by Cat
Shut Your Mouth When You Sneeze by Screaming ‘ Jay Hawkins
Crazy Queen by Zvuki Mu
Palisades Park by The Ramones
Keep Moving’ by Freddy Cannon & The Gears
Don’t Touch Me There by The Tubes
Friendly World by The Kittens

Voodoo Woman by Koko Taylor with Mighty Joe Young
A Little Bitch (And a  Little Bitch Better) by ’68 Comeback
I’m Through With White Girls by The Dirtbombs
Ship Sailed at Six by Barrence Whitfield & The Savages
In and Out by The Mummies
Bla Bla Bla by Los Cheyenes
Poison by Hundred Year Flood
Come On Up to the House by Oh Lazarus
Ohio River Boat Song by Palace Music

First of the Last Calls by Husker Du
Justified and Ancient by KLF with Tammy Wynette
Yona’s Blues by The Come ’n’ Go
Pallet on the Floor by Amanda Pearcy
I Hate These Songs by Dale Watson
As We Go Wandering by Possessed by Paul James
Empty Bottle by The Calamity Cubes
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Wednesday, June 03, 2020

WACKY WEDNESDAY: Beat the Gong, It's Chuck Barris' Birthday

Barris: Game show giant, CIA assassin, singer/songwriter

Chuck Barris, ascended master of the TV game show would have been 91 today.

Happy birthday, Chuck.

If you recognize his name, it's probably because of his role as host of one of his craziest creations, The Gong Show -- a strange talent show that I loved a zillion times more than American Idol, America's Got Talent and Dancing With the Stars put together. Barris hosted the original version of the show from its debut in 1976 through 1980.

By the time that first gong struck, Barris, who was born in Philadelphia, already had several game shows under his belt, including The Dating Game and The Newlywed Game -- not to mention noble flops like The Family Game, The Game Game and How's Your Mother-in-Law none of which I've ever seen.)

He's also an author. In 1984 he published his own “unauthorized autobiography” titled Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, in which he claimed he'd worked secretly as a CIA contract assassin during the years he was making his game shows. (Nearly 20 years later it was made into a movie directed by George Clooney and starring Sam Rockwell.)

The agency flatly denied that Barris had ever worked for them in any capacity, calling the claim "ridiculous.". A game-show blog (!) called BuzzerBlog, in its 2017 obituary for Barris claims that the late host had confessed as much in a 1984 appearance on the Today Show. I couldn't find any clip of that, but I did find a 2010 interview with the Television Academy Foundation in which Barris is still acting coy about his supposed time with the CIA.

But for the purpose of this music blog, Chuck's music career is what we're celebrating today.

He had a band called The Chuck Barris Syndicate in the '60s. Here's a 1968 tune called  "Donnie."



Here's a much snazzier number from 1980 called "Sometimes It Just Don't Pay To Get Up" credited to Chuck Barris & The Hollywood Cowboys Orchestra.



Barris, however, started out writing songs for others. Here's one from 1962 called "Summertime Guy" by Eddie Rambeau.



But by far the best-known Barris song was an ode to an amusement park that was a major hit for Freddy "Boom Boom" Cannon. I like this version by  The Ramones.



So let's strike the gong in memory of Chuck Barris.



Sunday, May 31, 2020

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST




Sunday, May 31, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
9 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
I’m Down by The Beatles
Get Down by Lucy & The Rats
I’ll Be Gone by The Oblivians
Zombie Outbreak by Alien Space Kitchen
When I Win the Lottery by Camper Van Beethoven
There Goes the Neighborhood by The Bus Boys
The Acid Song by Loudon Wainwright III

Tears, Stupid Tears by Nick Shoulders
Magical Colors by Jon Spencer Blues Explosion
The Green Manlishi by The Flesh Eaters
Dancing on My Knees by The Yawpers
Don’t Taser Me Bro by Carbon/Silicon
Cootzie Coo by Charlie Feathers
Christianity is Stupid by Negativland

Shortin’ Bread by The Cramps
Gimme Dat Harp, Boy by Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band
One Kind Favor by Canned Heat
Tajo by Cankisou
Black Shiny Beast by Buick MacKane
American Woman by Butthole Surfers
I’m Gonna Dig Up Howlin’ Wolf by Mojo Nixon & Skid Roper

What Would You Do by Trixie & The Trainwrecks
Duct Tape Love by He Who Cannot Be Named
Six Long Weeks by the A-Bones
Getting On with It by Mini-Mekons & Robbie Fulks
Big Zombie by Chivalrous Amoekons
Boodle De Bum Bum by Carolina Chocolate Drops
She’s Fine, She’s Mine by The Pretty Things
Nagazsaki by Cab Calloway

Hot Tamale Baby by Buckwheat Zydeco
Amos Moses by Primus
Bad Man by The Electric Mess
Masturbation Blues by Candye Kane
Fighting’ Side of Me by Bryan & The Haggards with Dr. Eugene Chadbourne
Cyrano deBerger’s Back by X
On Broadway by Neil Young
Wooden Heart by Brave Combo

Goon Squad by Elvis Costello
I Got Mine by Dan Hick & The Hot Licks
Drinkin’ Thing by Gary Stewart
That’s How I Got to Memphis by Solomon Burke
Good Bread Alley by Carl Hancock Rux
The Donor by Judee Sill

Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Thursday, May 28, 2020

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Happy Birthday Gary Stewart


Honky-tonk crooner Gary Stewart, one of the strongest new voices on country radio in the mid 1970s, would have been 75 today. 

Happy birthday, Gary!

Born in Kentucky, Stewart's family moved to Florida when he was a teen. He started playing in country and rock 'n' roll bands and writing songs. 

Stewart had a high, soulful voice with a tremolo that couldn't help but pierce your heart. It's on full display in his best known for two songs, both sung from the perspective of a cuckolded alcoholic.

The first, from late 1973, was called "Drinkin' Thing."



A few months later, he followed this with a song with an only-in-country-music title: "She's Acting Single, (I'm Drinking Doubles)."



Stewart didn't write these. They were penned by Wayne Carson, who also wrote The Box Tops' "The Letter" as well as "Always on My Mind," recorded by both Willie Nelson and Elvis Presley.

But Stewart had his first taste of national success through his songwriting.

He was playing a gig at the Wagon Wheel saloon in Okeechobee, Florida, where he had a chance meeting with one of his honky-tonk heroes 

"And there in Okeechobee, in walks Mel Tillis, Stewart said in a 1992 interview with the Phoenix New Times. "He took me aside and said, `You're good, son. But the key to getting there is writing.'"

So with his bandmate -- and police officer -- Bill Eldridge, Stewart wrote several hits for country stars. starting with Stonewall Jackson, who recorded their "Poor Red Georgia Dirt" in 1965.



In 1969, Cal Smith recorded Steart and Eldridge's "You Can't Housebreak a Tomcat."



But after Stewart's mid-70s success, things started going downhill for Stewart. He broke his leg in a car wreck in 1980. He told the New Times, "The damned doctor set the damn thing about 60 degrees out of whack. It didn't heal right, so the new doctor had to saw the damn thing in half and reset it. ... Now my one leg is a half-inch shorter than the other, and it always hurts like hell."

He already was fond of drugs. But his chronic pain increased his chronic consumption of painkillers.

According to a 2017 story in Oxford American:

His consumption of uppers, Quaaludes, and prescription painkillers became even more prodigious, and bleaker. He was hospitalized for overdoses at least three times. After a few ill-conceived duds in the early 1980s, RCA dropped him in 1983. 

Stewart's only son committed suicide in 1988, which devastated the singer,

But by the end of the decade he began recording agin for the (late lamented) independent label Hightone. He did three albums for the company between 1988 and 1993.

On Nov. 26, 2003, Mary Lou, Stewart's wife of 43 years died of pneumonia. Just weeks later, Stewart ended his own life.

In closing, here's "Ten Years of This," a song that Stewart co-wrote with Wayne Carson. According to the Oxford American, Bob Dylan told Stewart "he couldn’t stop playing it, over and over again. "



Sunday, May 24, 2020

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

UPDATED: ADDED THE THIRD HOUR TO MIXCLOUD. 
LINK AND MEDIA PLAYER BELOW



Sunday, May 24, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
9 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrell(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :
OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Lost on Xandu by Lenny Kaye & The Fleshtones
Hey Gyp (Dig the Slowness) by The Ranconteurs
Obeah Man by Meet Your Death
You Can’t Judge a Book by Bo Diddley
Nervous Breakdown by Destination Lonely
Zombie Cop by Mean Motor Scooter
I Am Gonna Unmask the Batman by Lacy Gibson

Strange Life by X
She Only Loves My ’32 by Elvis From Outer Space
Norman Bates by The Tailgators
Fireflyby Southern Culture on the Skids
In a Young Man’s Mind by The Mooney Suzuki
Magic Potion by The Open Mind
I Kissed a Ghoul by Nekromantix
White Lightnin’ by The Big Bopper
Hope You Don’t Mind by Johnny Dowd
OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres

LITTLE RICHARD TRIBUTE SET

Heebie Jeebies by Little Richard
Long Tall Sally by Wanda Jackson
Tutti-Fruitti by MC 5
JennyTake a Ride by Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels
I’m Just a Lonely Guy by Little Richard
Slipping’ and Sliding’ by The Band
Kansas City/Hey! Hey! Hey! by The Beatles
I Saw Her Standing There by Jerry Lee Lewis with Little Richard
Good Golly Miss Molly by The Sonics
Lucille by NRBQ
Rip It Up by Elvis Presley
Elvis is Dead by Living Colour
Groovy Little Suzie by Little Richard

Piece of Crap by Neil Young & Crazy Horse
She’s Wild by The Vagoos
We’re a Bad Trip by Mondo Topless
I Am Well and Missing You by Women of the Night
Soteria by TAD
Boogie the Church Down by Juke Joint Pimps
Highway Junkie by The Yayoos

Peppermint Man by Dick Dale
Clever Way to Crawl by Persian Claws
Tear the Club Up by The Dirtbombs
Rooster Blues by James Luther Dickinson
Fucked Up World by Jimbo Mathus
Charlottesville by Jesse Dayton
Mr. Hitler by Billy Childish & The Blackhands
They Saved Hitler’s Cock by The Angry Samoans
Hitler Song by Lead Belly
Der Fueher’s Face by Spike Jones
Nazi Punks Fuck Off by Eugene Chadbourne

Cherry Bomb by Joan Jett & L7
No Place in Space by The Scaners
How Can I Make Her Mine by Lyres
Gotta Get Fired by The Sloths
Blue Jean Vincent by Havana 3 AM
A Real Indication by Thought Gang
Booze Farm by Boris McCutcheon & The Salt Licks
They Crowned an Idiot King by Swamp Dogg
Jeannie’s Afraid of the Dark by Robbie Fulks
CLOSING THEME: Over the Rainbow by Jerry Lee Lewis

The third hour of this show is on Mixcloud. You can play it below:


Like the Terrell's Sound World Facebook page


Want to keep the party going after I sign off at midnight?
Go to The Big Enchilada Podcast which has hours and hours of music like this.

Subscribe to The Big Enchilada Podcast CLICK HERE

Saturday, May 23, 2020

A Very Magical Big Enchilada

THE BIG ENCHILADA


Do you believe in magic? If not, you will will by the end of this magical episode of The Big Enchilada. This month I'm featuring enchanting songs from Lenny Kaye, The Fleshtones, Mark Sultan, Magic Sam and more unexplainable treats.

Remember, The Big Enchilada still is officially listed in the iTunes store. So go subscribe, if you haven't already (and please, gentle listeners, give me a five-star rating and review if you're so inclined.) Thanks. 
DOWNLOAD SUBSCRIBE | MIXCLOUD FACEBOOK iTUNES! |



Mixcloud is now the official home of Radio Mutation

Here's the playlist:

(Background Music: A Matterapat by Dr. Lonnie Smith)
Say These Magic Words by The Cave Girls
Lost on Xandu by Lenny Kaye & The Fleshtones
Hey Gyp (Dig the Slowness) by The Ranconteurs
She Only Loves My '32 by Elvis from Outta Space
Magic Potion from The Open Mind
One Way by Johnny Dowd

(Background Music: Lonely Road to Damascus by Milt Rogers & His Orchestra)
Black Magic by Mark Sultan
Norman Bates by The Tailgators
Three-Time Loser by Linda Hopkins
Yona's Blues by The Come N' Go
Kill That Guy by The Von Zippers
99th Floor by Mal Thursday
A Good Problem by He Who Cannot Be Named

(Background Music: The Moocher by The Lancers)
Magical Colors by Jon Spencer Blues Explosion
Tarzan by Artie Wilson
Lay Down and Die by The Gooeys
You Belong to Me by Magic Sam
White Lighter by Women of the Night
(Background Music: Sewer Surfing by The Vagoos)

Play it below:





Wednesday, May 20, 2020

WACKY WEDNESDAY: Happy World Bee Day!


Bee-kini girls with machine guns

What's the buzz? It's World Bee Day! And it's a honey of a holiday.

From the United Nations website.

To raise awareness of the importance of pollinators, the threats they face and their contribution to sustainable development, the UN designated 20 May as World Bee Day. 

 The goal is to strengthen measures aimed at protecting bees and other pollinators, which would significantly contribute to solving problems related to the global food supply and eliminate hunger in developing countries.

To celebrate this festive occasion, here are some of my favorite songs about these insect allies.

Let's start with Lavern Baker.



Fats Domino, according to a legend I just made up, used to look for wild honeys on Blueberry Hill.



Perhaps the greatest bee song in human or insect history is this classic by The Hollywood Flames



Slim Harpo was King



Speaking of kings, even Elvis got stung



This is how Muddy Waters celebrated World Bee Day



Here's Big Al puttin' the Hirt on 'em. (It's called "The Green Hornet Theme" here, but true fans know it's really "Flight of the Bumble Bee.")



Speaking of hornets, before there were Murder Hornets, there were African Killer Bees!




Sunday, May 17, 2020

TERRELL'S SOUND WORLD PLAYLIST

Updated



Sunday, May 17, 2020
KSFR, Santa Fe, NM
Webcasting!
9 p.m. to midnight Sundays Mountain Time
Host: Steve Terrell 101.1 FM
Email me during the show! terrel(at)ksfr.org

Here's my playlist :

OPENING THEME: Let It Out (Let it All Hang Out) by The Hombres
Psycho Train by Sinister Six
White Sand by Boss Hog
Loaded Gun by C.C. Adcock
I Got Fever by X
After the Money’s Gone by The Electric Mess
Tumblin’ Down by Weird Omen
Diamond Eyes by The Black Angels

An Ugly Death by Jay Reatard
Who Shot the Druggies by Lynx Lynx
I Wanna Go by Los Mockers
Dad, Why Did My Friends Explode? By Deadbolt
American Travelust by Charlie Pickett
New Orleans by The Plimsouls with The Fleshtones
Truly Ruly by Hasil Adkins
I Need a Man by Barbara Pittman

UPDATED: Due to some technical failure the lat two hours of Sound World did not air Sunday night.

Thursday, May 14, 2020

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Jamel Reacts


As usual for a Throwback Thursday post, this one features a bunch of videos with great old songs. But this time, neither the music itself isn't nor the story behind the songs isn't the actual point.

This is about a young man -- well, younger than me -- who has become something of a YouTube sensation for his reactions to various music videos, a Los Angeles native named Jamel Griffin, known to his YouTube fans as Jamel aka Jamal. He has a friendly smile, a curious spirit and an enthusiasm for music that's outage contagious.

He's not a music scholar, nor is he a celebrity scenester. You won't learn much about the history of a song or a band by watching his videos. He doesn't dispense deep critical insights. Nor will you pick up any news or gossip about any of the musicians in the videos. Jamel, in doing this project, seems to be giving himself an education by watching all kinds of music videos for the first time -- and we get to see his reactions.

And he says more with his big smile and a simple "Oooo ooo" or "Man!" in acknowledging a tasty guitar solo or poignant lyric than most of us critics can with hundreds of words.

Jamel's videos remind me of one of my favorite moments from the popular podcast Dolly Parton's America last year. In one episode, host Jad Abumrad and his producer delight in hearing the Loretta Lynn song “Fist City” for the first time. They're just amazed at Loretta's song. How could a woman get away with singing those lyrics in the 1960s? Some jaded old cynics may think, how can these kids be making this show about a country music giant when they aren't even familiar with "Fist City"? However, the unfettered joy of their discovery took me back to my wayward youth when I first discovered the song.

And that's how it is with Jamel. His videos that I've seen capture how a song affects his soul.

This is the first Jamel aka Jamal video I ever stumbled upon, Primus' crazy "Jerry Was a Race Car Driver."



While it seems the lion's share of the videos he reacts to are by classic rock bands, Jamel also has done a lot of country videos as well. Here he looks at Patsy Cline.



And here he looks at Charlie Pride, performing his biggest hit. When Charlie walks out to the stage, after being introduced by Marty Stuart, Jamel shouts, "Country!" as if he didn't realize that indeed Charlie Pride is a country music star. And the fact that African-Americans can succeed and excel in a style of music that typically isn't associated with Black people seriously touches him. "Music unites!" he declares.



Jamel is truly moved by Elvis Presley's "In the Ghetto." He talks about how it reminds him of his own difficult childhood in South Central Los Angeles.



And he seems absolutely devastated by the raw pain that Johnny Cash expressed so clearly on his cover of Nine Inch Nails' "Hurt."



Unlike most of his reaction videos, in which he considers songs he's never heard before, in this recent one, he pays tribute to Little Richard. It's obvious the late rock 'n' roll titan still amazes and excites Jamel -- as he does all of us who loved him.




THROWBACK THURSDAY: Happy Birthday, Eddie Dean

One hundred thirteen years ago in a town called Posey, Texas, one of America's most famous singing cowboys was born. Happy birthday...